CNS

Democratic Candidates Spar in South Carolina Debate

Seven Democratic presidential candidates took aim at each other in a debate Tuesday where they attempted to distinguish themselves as the one who can beat President Donald Trump in November.

by ELLEN ROBINSON

GOP Senators Take Aim at Nationwide Injunctions

Senate Republicans want to put a stop to nationwide injunctions, aiming to stifle the power of courts that have placed blocks on Trump administration policies from coast to coast.

by MEGAN MINEIRO
Pins declaring support for Democratic presidential candidate and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren. (Amanda Pampuro / CNS)

Voters in Purple Colorado Weigh Their Primary Options

Purple state voters like those in Colorado don’t always offer a good measurement for predicting the results of the 2020 Democratic primary, but they are always prime to discuss the nitty-gritty nuances.

by AMANDA PAMPURO

Florida Democrats Sue to Kick Sanders Off Primary Ballot

by BRAD KUTNER

California Lawmaker Pushes Bill to Allow Human Composting

Hoping to turn funerals green, a California lawmaker is pushing legislation that would allow families to compost their loved ones and turn their remains into soil.

by NICK CAHILL

Auditor Slams California Lottery for Shortchanging Schools by Millions

by NICK CAHILL

Supreme Court

Trump Lashes Out at Liberal Supreme Court Justices

Escalating his intervention in the court system, President Donald Trump took aim Tuesday morning at Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

by BRAD KUTNER

Death-Row Inmate Loses High Court Fight Over Mitigating Evidence

The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday against a man convicted of murder who argued that he might have avoided death row if allowed to tell jurors about the difficult circumstances of his childhood.

by TIM RYAN

Justices Shut Door on Cross-Border Shooting of Teen in Mexico

A Mexican family cannot sue the U.S. border patrol agent who shot across the border and killed their 15-year-old son in Mexico, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

by TIM RYAN & ERIKA WILLIAMS

Columns

Tradition of Same-Day Access in American Courts

by BILL GIRDNER

A sweeping opinion saying the press is entitled under the First Amendment to see new civil complaints on the day they are filed was based on a four-day trial that included testimony on the tradition of access in American courts.

Human Rights Court Rules for Convicted Icelandic Banker

Owning stock in a collapsing Icelandic bank may have affected the impartiality of judges in a trial of one of the bank’s top executives, the European Court of Human Rights found Tuesday.

by MOLLY QUELL

Turkey’s State-Run Halkbank Agrees to US Arraignment

After more than three months of resistance over its money-laundering indictment, Turkey’s state-run Halkbank agreed Tuesday to be arraigned in the United States.

by ADAM KLASFELD

In the Courts

Roger Stone Warned to Tread Carefully With Biased-Juror Claim

In a dramatic turn of events in the case of President Donald Trump’s confidante Roger Stone, the judge called the jury foreperson attacked by Trump to the witness stand Tuesday in a hearing to determine whether Stone should get a new trial.

by MEGAN MINEIRO

Immigration Consultant Fights 'Encouragement' Conviction at Top Court

Defending the prosecution of a woman who encouraged immigrants to overstay their visas, a lawyer for the government assured the Supreme Court on Tuesday that exhorting one’s own grandchild in the same way would not run afoul of the law.

by JACK RODGERS

Judge Rules Instacart Likely Misclassifies Its California Workers

The San Diego City Attorney announced Tuesday that a state court judge has found grocery delivery company Instacart likely violates state employment laws by misclassifying its grocery shoppers as independent contractors, eschewing paying its employees benefits.

by BIANCA BRUNO

On Capitol Hill

Tragedies Mark Path to Anti-Lynching Bill Up for House Vote

In 1918 when a white mob hanged Mary Turner from a tree, then drenched the pregnant 20-year-old in gasoline and lit a match, federal law did not treat lynching as a hate crime.

by BRANDI BUCHMAN

Barr Pushes Republicans to Reauthorize Surveillance Powers

Attorney General William Barr urged Senate Republicans on Tuesday to renew expiring provisions of a controversial surveillance law that has come under fire from President Donald Trump after its use in investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

by TIM RYAN

SCOTUS Waves Goodbye to Rule on Tax-Refund Distribution

The U.S. Supreme Court was unanimous Tuesday in trashing a rule several federal appeals courts have used for decades to determine how tax refunds are distributed to parent companies and their subsidiaries.

by TIM RYAN

Science & the Environment

Study Challenges Human Toll of Ancient Volcanic Super-Eruption

Scientists have long thought a massive volcanic eruption some 74,000 years ago plunged the world into volcanic winter and nearly erased early humanity. New research may suggest otherwise.

by CARSON MCCULLOUGH

Military Unveils Guidelines on Artificial Intelligence Warfare

To keep pace with technological advancements on the battlefield, the Pentagon has announced new ethical principles governing military use and design of artificial intelligence.

by ERIKA WILLIAMS

R Kelly Accuser Wins Default Judgment in Civil Case

R&B star R. Kelly lost one of his many court battles Tuesday, with a Cook County judge granting a default judgment in a civil sexual assault case against him.

by LISA KLEIN

Judge Extends Block on Coronavirus Quarantine Site in California

A federal judge Monday extended a temporary order blocking the establishment of a coronavirus quarantine site in Costa Mesa, California, and ordered officials to hash out the details of plans to bring infected people to the facility.

by NATHAN SOLIS
Musician R. Kelly departs from the Leighton Criminal Court building after a status hearing in his criminal sexual abuse trial Wednesday, June 26, 2019 in Chicago. (AP Photo/Amr Alfiky)
FILE - This Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020, file photo provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services shows evacuees from China arriving at Marine Corps Air Station in Miramar, Calif. An evacuee from China has tested positive for the coronavirus and has been isolated at a San Diego hospital, a person with direct knowledge of the matter tells The Associated Press, Monday, Feb. 10, 2020. (Krysten I. Houk/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services via AP, File)

In Brief

by ROBERT KAHN

Walt Girdner was born in central Iowa in 1922, one of five children. His father took a job as a Christian minister in Alameda after the family moved to California in 1925. Growing up during the Great Depression, Walt worked double shifts at a cannery to make money for college. He attended Stanford where he put together a string of letters and wins, running the quarter and half-mile. An invitation to join the U.S. Olympic team was negated by World War II and cancellation of the games. During the war, he disembarked in Normandy, fought in the infantry and marched into Germany .

As a young man, he developed an interest in imagery, first through drawing then through the developing technology of photography. Although he left the church where his mother and father were pastors, he kept a lifelong faith in the power and mystery of the natural environment, seeing in its beauty an overriding and everlasting spiritual force. His subjects focused on people and their settings. Farmers, flower sellers, youth were recurring themes.

He traveled in large part to find new images and capture them, in France at first, then the rest of Europe and later Africa and Mexico. Towards the end of his life, Walt focused on images in nature, including letters and numbers that emerged through abalone shells, beach tableaus and patterns in the sand.  He had faith that imagery was a powerful way to communicate and believed young people were much better at interpreting the language of imagery, gifted with imaginations more agile and unencumbered.

Rulings

by KELSEY JUKAM

More Top News

Briefings

Icy cold Lake Powell on hot day at the Arizona-Utah border. (Bill Girdner / CNS)