CNS

House Democrats Call Trump a ‘Danger’ to National Security

Warning the Senate that its decision in the impeachment trial of President Trump will be pivotal in deciding whether the United States remains “a safe and secure democracy,” House Democrats on Saturday laid out its case that the president must be removed from office.

by TIM RYAN

Trump’s Lawyers Call Impeachment ‘Unlawful’ in New Brief

Ahead of next week’s Senate impeachment trial, President Trump’s legal team on Saturday launched a broadside on House Democrats’ articles of impeachment, echoing past claims that they are on shaky legal ground as the result of a flawed process.

by TIM RYAN

Saving the Planet

Ninth Circuit Tosses Youth Climate Change Suit Against Feds

The Ninth Circuit halted a landmark climate change suit against the federal government filed by 21 young people, finding courts lack the authority to craft climate policy that ensures a planet capable of sustaining human life.

by KARINA BROWN
FILE - In this July 18, 2018, file photo, lawyers and youth plaintiffs lineup behind a banner after a hearing before Federal District Court Judge Ann Aiken between lawyers for the Trump Administration and the so called Climate Kids in Federal Court in Eugene, Ore. The U.S. government is trying once again to block a major climate change lawsuit days before young activists are set to argue at trial that the government has violated their constitutional rights by failing to take action climate change. On Thursday, Oct. 18, 2018, the Justice Department for a second time this year asked the U.S. Supreme Court to dismiss the case. The high court in July denied the request as premature. (Chris Pietsch/The Register-Guard via AP, File)

California Sues Feds Over Plan to Open State to Fracking

In the latest clash over environmental policy between the Golden State and federal government, California sued the Trump administration Friday over its plan to open over a million acres of the state’s public lands to oil and gas drilling.

by NICHOLAS IOVINO

2020 Elections

San Diego Area House Seat a Toss-Up After Duncan Hunter Resignation

Congressman Duncan Hunter’s guilty plea to a single charge of campaign finance fraud late last year and his resignation this week has made the 50th Congressional District race one of the most-watched 2020 races in the nation, as a millennial Democratic candidate makes his second attempt to flip the Republican stronghold.

by BIANCA BRUNO

Expert Says Hackers Tampered With Georgia Election Server

by KAYLA GOGGIN

Sanders Leads Democratic Pack in First Primary State

A poll released Friday shows Senator Bernie Sanders holds a lead over his Democratic rivals in New Hampshire.

by JAMES PALMER

Justices to Decide 'Faithless Electors' Case Before 2020 Election

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear a case on whether Electoral College voters are legally bound to cast their ballot for president in line with their state’s popular vote.

by MEGAN MINEIRO
ElectoralCollege2016

Bloomberg Revs Up Electric Vehicle Plan for 2020 Campaign

by ZACK HUFFMAN

Virginia High Court Upholds Weapons Ban at Capitol Pro-Gun Rally

Siding with the governor, the Virginia Supreme Court refused to overturn a complete ban on all weapons on the Virginia Capitol grounds ahead of a pro-gun rally to be held there Monday.

by BRAD KUTNER

California Court Administrators Eye Tech Projects for Budget Windfall

Eyeing a generous infusion of cash from Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposed budget, the Judicial Council of California is pushing to modernize the courts with tech innovations that should make navigating the justice system a little easier.

by MARIA DINZEO

Column

A Fraud and Disgrace

United States immigration courts today are a fraud and disgrace, by design. They are intended to keep refugees trapped on the border — not to give them access to justice or a fair hearing.

by ROBERT KAHN

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to again take up a dispute over whether religious groups are exempt from the requirement that health insurance plans cover contraception.

High Court to Decide Where Auto Giant Can Be Sued Over Crashes

The Supreme Court on Friday agreed to decide whether Ford must go into courts in Minnesota and Montana to defend itself from claims that it should be held liable for car crashes that left a woman dead and a man with a brain injury.

by TIM RYAN

Alumni Fight Removal of Confederate General From School Name

While Virginia state courts were closed Friday in honor of Lee-Jackson Day, an alumni group filed a federal lawsuit challenging the removal of one of those Confederate generals from their high school’s name.

by BRAD KUTNER

Texas Ex-Police Chief Charged With Taking $134,000 in Bribes

A former Texas police chief was arrested Friday for allegedly accepting several bribes in exchange for steering millions of dollars in government contracts for certain vendors.

by DAVID LEE

IRS Worker Who Leaked Cohen Docs Sentenced to Five Years Probation

An IRS employee accused of illegally leaking former Trump attorney Michael Cohen’s bank information to Stormy Daniels’ lawyer was sentenced to five years probation Friday after pleading guilty to one count of disclosing unauthorized documents.

by NICHOLAS IOVINO

Indiana Loses Appeal in Fight Over Same-Sex Birth Certificates

State officials in Indiana must list both same-sex parents on their child’s birth certificate, the Seventh Circuit ruled Friday.

by LORRAINE BAILEY

In Brief

by ROBERT KAHN

Walt Girdner was born in central Iowa in 1922, one of five children. His father took a job as a Christian minister in Alameda after the family moved to California in 1925. Growing up during the Great Depression, Walt worked double shifts at a cannery to make money for college. He attended Stanford where he put together a string of letters and wins, running the quarter and half-mile. An invitation to join the U.S. Olympic team was negated by World War II and cancellation of the games. During the war, he disembarked in Normandy, fought in the infantry and marched into Germany .

As a young man, he developed an interest in imagery, first through drawing then through the developing technology of photography. Although he left the church where his mother and father were pastors, he kept a lifelong faith in the power and mystery of the natural environment, seeing in its beauty an overriding and everlasting spiritual force. His subjects focused on people and their settings. Farmers, flower sellers, youth were recurring themes.

He traveled in large part to find new images and capture them, in France at first, then the rest of Europe and later Africa and Mexico. Towards the end of his life, Walt focused on images in nature, including letters and numbers that emerged through abalone shells, beach tableaus and patterns in the sand.  He had faith that imagery was a powerful way to communicate and believed young people were much better at interpreting the language of imagery, gifted with imaginations more agile and unencumbered.

Rulings

by KELSEY JUKAM

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Briefings

Yellowstone Canyon and River (Chris Marshall/CNS)