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Backing the law still cheekily called Obamacare for the third time, the Supreme Court saw its conservative justices sharply divided on whether Texas and other state challengers have standing.

by BRANDI BUCHMAN

by ALEXANDRA JONES

The justices threw out the case of Six African men claiming Nestle was complicit in the use of child slavery on Ivory Coast cocoa plantations.

by BRANDI BUCHMAN & JACK RODGERS

The giant, deep-sea fish from millions of years ago is still alive today, and can live for up to a century.

by MADELINE REYES

Researchers found the number of hospital admissions for heart attacks in Germany was higher during the 2014 soccer tournament than in other years.

by MARTIN MACIAS JR.

The EU court’s ruling came in the case of a Cypriot company that accused Belgian internet customers of illegally downloading erotic films like “Malibu Massage Parlor 3” and “The Girl Next Door 16.”

by MOLLY QUELL

A federal judge said the policy, which prohibits even written mentions of nudity, was overbroad and banned protected materials.

by ANDY MONSERUD

Courts

Pastor Jim Bakker said on his TV show that his silver solution product can treat Covid-19, and now claims investigative demands by Arkansas and California officials violate his church’s First Amendment rights.

by JOE HARRIS

The 2017 movie “Kidnapping,” about the 1995 abduction of the son of the country’s then-president, quickly became the most popular movie ever in Slovakia, beating out Harry Potter at the box office. 

by MOLLY QUELL

by JUNE WILLIAMS

Health

The Covid-19 pandemic has shined a spotlight on the declining mental health and lack of access to basic needs for college students. Lawmakers and university officials agree that this fall, services need to improve. 

by SAMANTHA HAWKINS

by ERIKA WILLIAMS

The organ transplant hospitals argue the government’s change from a regional to a national system will shift kidney donations from smaller states to large urban centers.

by ROX LAIRD

Across the Nation

The law has been used to launch strikes not authorized by Congress as recently as last year, when former President Donald Trump killed Iranian military leader Qasem Soleimani.

by JACK RODGERS

by BRANDI BUCHMAN

The crowded field traded heated barbs on policing and public safety during the final debate Wednesday evening.

by JOSH RUSSELL

Record temperatures, a dry winter and degrading air quality in the West represent a threat to public health. 

by MATTHEW RENDA

A developer set its sights on a piece of pristine Alaskan wilderness for a proposed mining operation — plans that have stalled in recent months.

by NATHAN SOLIS

by MATTHEW RENDA

by KAILA PHILO

A federal judge asked one attorney for the imprisoned R&B singer about her contact with two women who lived with Kelly until his July 2019 arrest. 

by NINA PULLANO

The state’s Republican governor and attorney general argue a new law that penalizes local police for enforcing federal firearm restrictions protects citizens’ gun rights.

by JOE HARRIS

Two former call center employees sued the health care giant claiming violations of federal and state wage laws.

by MARTIN MACIAS JR.

Podcast

In episode 2 of our new podcast, we break down this spring’s dramatic — and right-leaning — Texas legislative session, the federal trial into the failure of a cryogenic tank containing human embryos and eggs, and an upcoming fight over California’s ban on high-capacity gun magazines.

Rulings

by KELSEY JUKAM

An appeals court upheld the dismissal of a request to compel the Texas secretary of state to release the personal email addresses of the state’s 38 presidential electors, because they don’t belong to a “governmental body.”

An appeals court in Texas upheld a ruling in favor of Houston Baseball Partners, which bought the Houston Astros and its 46% share of a regional sports television network in 2011. The entity may pursue its fraud claims against former owner Drayton McLane and media companies Comcast and NBCUniversal over the alleged misrepresentation of the valuation of the network. 

In a memorandum endorsement, a federal court in New York granted Kevin Spacey’s motion to dismiss claims brought by an anonymous plaintiff who alleged the actor sexually assaulted him when he was a minor. 

The Florida Supreme Court ruled that a ballot initiative attempting to legalize the use of marijuana for people aged 21 and older cannot be placed on the ballot because its summary is “affirmatively misleading.”

In a case brought against Twitter, Google and Facebook by a Dallas police officer who was injured in a mass shooting against police officers in 2016, the Fifth Circuit ruled that internet services and social media providers cannot be held secondarily liable under the Anti-Terrorism Act for aiding and abetting a foreign terrorist group based on acts committed by a single person in the United States.

From the Walt Girdner Studio

Hot Cases

Mark and Patricia McCloskey, the St. Louis couple charged with unlawful use of a weapon for waving guns at civil rights protesters in front of their mansion, pleaded guilty Thursday to lesser charges of assault and harassment.

A class of residents of Chicago’s 45th Ward sued their alderman in federal court for removing critical comments on his Facebook page and blocking some users, claiming his actions amount to content-based regulation of speech.

The family of a Sacramento Police officer killed while responding to a domestic disturbance sued nearly 20 purveyors of so-called “ghost guns,” saying they skirt federal and state gun laws by selling kits that allow people to turn rifles into ghost guns and self-assembled assault-style weapons.

The Senate on Tuesday unanimously passed a resolution establishing a national holiday for Juneteenth, the June 19 celebration of the emancipation of more than 250,000 slaves at the close of the Civil War. 

Former San Francisco Department of Human Resources manager Rebecca Sherman has been charged with two counts of felony forgery for allegedly falsifying documents that purported to settle a lawsuit with an employee who had filed a complaint. 

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Places

Icy cold Lake Powell on hot day at the Arizona-Utah border. (Courthouse News photo / Bill Girdner)