CNS

Finding that multiple managerial failures under the Trump administration have undermined the mission of the U.S. Postal Service, a federal judge ordered the agency on Monday to preapprove all overtime for the upcoming election and to prioritize all ballot-related mail.

by JOSH RUSSELL

In a blow to the Trump campaign in a key battleground state, a federal judge rejected a bid to shoot down Nevada’s plan to expand mail-in voting during the state of emergency caused by the novel coronavirus pandemic.

by MARTIN MACIAS JR.

The Bobcat Fire — one of the largest fires in Los Angeles County history at over 105,000 acres — tore into the high desert over the weekend, destroying multiple homes.

by NATHAN SOLIS

Investors hoping for a fresh start this week were rattled over the weekend by allegations that several large banks had laundered about $2 trillion in illicit funds, sending markets into a freefall.

by NICK RUMMELL

A week of hearings into whether the United Nations’ high court has jurisdiction to determine whether the Trump administration’s decision to back out of the Iran nuclear deal and reinstate sanctions violates a 65-year-old friendship treaty wrapped Monday.

by MOLLY QUELL

A record-breaking number of voting rights lawsuits have been filed in the lead-up to the November election, with 82% more cases filed this year compared to the same time during the last presidential election, according to a new report Monday.

by BIANCA BRUNO

Special Investigation

by ADAM KLASFELD, TOM STOCKS, DANIELA CASTRO & KELLY BLOSS

A Turk who hauled massive amounts of gold in a record-breaking sanctions-busting scheme remembers his first conversation about it vividly, some 12 years on.

A new investigation by OCCRP and Courthouse News Service shows that Russia was central to Zarrab’s money network even before he began working for Iran. The lucrative business is evident in thousands of bank transfer records obtained by OCCRP and has been described in interviews by a Zarrab insider who says he smuggled millions of dollars to Russia.

On the day of his arrest in a massive money-laundering scheme that still sours relations between the United States and Turkey, Reza Zarrab was consumed by his true passion: the sea.

Columns

MILT POLICZER

Your email inbox is filled every day with groups and/or people you don’t know claiming to be your friends who vitally need your money RIGHT NOW to stop the apocalypse and you really want to help — but there are SO MANY of them!

ROBERT KAHN

Across the Nation

Chinese-owned messaging app WeChat was still available for download Monday, following a federal judge’s order over the weekend blocking the U.S. Commerce Department from forcing Apple and Google to remove it from their app stores.

by MARIA DINZEO

by JACK RODGERS

Lawyers for nicotine giants Juul and Altria pulled out all the stops Monday to defeat a multidistrict class action claiming they conspired to get young people hooked on addictive e-cigarettes with deceptive ads and marketing campaigns.

by NICHOLAS IOVINO

As the U.S. coronavirus death toll nears 200,000, House Democrats hoping to sidestep a government shutdown rolled out a temporary funding bill on Monday to keep federal offices afloat through December. 

by MEGAN MINEIRO

A woman whose child died during childbirth in a New Mexico prison asked the 10th Circuit on Monday to revive her lawsuit, which a lower court tossed after finding the doctor and two nurses who failed to send her to a hospital were entitled to qualified immunity.

by AMANDA PAMPURO

Rulings

by KELSEY JUKAM

A federal judge has certified the class in a lawsuit over Keurig’s single-serve coffee pods, some of which are marketed as “recyclable” though the plaintiffs claim it’s nearly impossible to do so.

A federal judge partially granted Home Depot’s request to dismiss a lawsuit claiming the home improvement giant fails to warn its customers about the cancer risks of the herbicide Roundup, giving the plaintiff until Oct. 2 to file a final effort to make their case.

Colorado settled its lawsuit against the United States Postal Service over flyers the service sent out that contained misleading information about voting in the state. Under the terms of the agreement, the Postal Service will remove the flyers that have not yet been delivered from its system and will seek input from the state to change information on its voting website.

Civil procedure for “deeming certain pleadings timely filed is not invoked” when a party sends a pleading by private courier, like UPS, rather than first-class U.S. mail, an appeals court in Texas ruled in a personal injury case that was filed one day after the two-year limitations period had expired. 

Federal law only required waterborne vessels — and not aircraft — to publicly disclose their manifests, which include information about where the vessel has traveled and what it had on board, the Second Circuit ruled.

From the Walt Girdner Studio

Hot Cases

Claiming her endorsement made Just Peachy wine a success, former “Real Housewives of Atlanta” star Claudia Jordan claims in a federal complaint that Wine Biagio Cru and Estate Wines hasn’t paid her since 2018 after deeming her public support of Black Lives Matter “too slanted.” 

Parents of high school athletes in Missouri sued the County of St. Louis over an order temporarily shutting down high school sports because of the Covid-19 pandemic. The plaintiffs say the order affects more than 100,000 students. 

A federal judge on Friday denied a bid by the Bureau of Prisons and the Lompoc federal prison warden to dismiss a lawsuit by more than 1,000 inmates who seek expedited review for compassionate release and home confinement after they tested positive for Covid-19.

Former Texas state judge Alexandra Smoots-Thomas pleaded guilty to embezzling campaign funds to spend on jewelry, her mortgage and her children’s private school tuition. 

A former University of California, San Diego, brain cancer researcher and the UC regents have sued each other in a dispute over a $10 million gift from a patient of the researcher to the university’s cancer center.

More News

Places

Starting in coastal hills west of the town of Occidental, Salmon Creek empties into the Pacific Ocean at California’s Sonoma Coast State Park. A few dozen homes cozy up near the mouth of the waterway in a hamlet that shares its name. (Courthouse News photo / Chris Marshall)