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The World Health Organization is warning the coronavirus pandemic is worsening in many parts of the world amid a global shortage of vaccine doses.

by CAIN BURDEAU

by NINA PULLANO

For the second straight month the state led the nation with over 100,000 new jobs as workers appear eager to finally rejoin the workforce.

by NICK CAHILL

It’s the latest shot in a decades-long war over beach access and conservation concerns at the Oceano Dunes State Vehicular Recreation Area. 

by JON PARTON

Column

ROBERT KAHN

Dear IRS: Enclosed please find my W-2 and 1040. I’m sorry, but even with TurboTax and plenty o’ caffeine, I could not make head or tails of your tax forms this year.

On top of outpacing his own numbers from last month, Biden is also outperforming the approval ratings earned by former President Donald Trump when comparing their earliest formative days as president.

by CARSON MCCULLOUGH

In the Courts

International satellite companies say that it’s unfair that they have to pay double the regulatory fees, but didn’t seem to receive much sympathy from a panel in Washington.

by SAMANTHA HAWKINS

One Fair Wage is suing Darden, the parent group of restaurant chains like Olive Garden, Capitol Grille and Longhorn Steakhouse for wage policies that it says causes sexual harassment and pay disparity among servers.

by MARIA DINZEO

by NINA PULLANO

Diplomatic Freeze

The retaliatory measures out of Moscow come one day after the United States gave marching orders to 10 of Russia’s diplomats.

by ALEXANDRA JONES

Across the Nation

by BRANDI BUCHMAN

PG&E has until May 5 to disclose how it will improve risk-based prioritization of fire prevention work or face revocation of its operating license.  

by NICHOLAS IOVINO

by BRANDI BUCHMAN

After a decade of statewide losses, a handful of Virginia Republicans hope to unseat the twice-elected incumbent, Democrat Mark Herring. But so does a young, progressive Democratic primary opponent.

by BRAD KUTNER

John Porter faces 30 years in federal prison if convicted on charges of bribing the former head of San Francisco’s public works department to charge San Franciscans higher rates for trash pickup.

by MARIA DINZEO

A deeply divided 11th Circuit acknowledged prosecutors misled victims of billionaire Jeffrey Epstein when they struck a plea deal granting him immunity, but a majority held victims cannot challenge the deal now.

by KAYLA GOGGIN

Rulings

by KELSEY JUKAM

An appeals court in Texas vacated the sentence of the state’s longest-serving death row inmate, Raymond Riles. The jury that convicted Riles for shooting a man to death during a robbery did not receive a “mitigation-focused” instruction but should have because of the mental health evidence presented at trial, including witness testimony that he was often psychotic and had schizophrenia. 

The Seventh Circuit overturned a $6 million judgment against DuPont, Sherwin Williams and Armstrong Containers in “sprawling toxic-tort cases” relating to white lead carbonate, which is used as the pigment in many lead-based paints.

The Fourth Circuit upheld the dismissal of Russian academic Svetlana Lokhova’s tort claims against American foreign policy scholar Stefan Halper and several news organizations. Lokhova accused the defendants of defaming her by falsely stating she was a Russian spy who was involved in collusion between Russia and Donald Trump’s campaign. 

A federal court in Florida certified a class of individuals who made credit or debit card purchases at Chili’s restaurant locations affected by a data breach. The court certified a nationwide class on its negligence claim and a class of California residents on unfair competition law claims. 

A federal court in California approved a class action settlement between the city of Oakland and a class that claims the city allowed rental scooters to block sidewalks and driveways. 

From the Walt Girdner Studio

Hot Cases

A nonprofit and four individuals accuse the Wichita Police Department of violating their constitutional rights by using “gang lists” that disproportionately target people of color.

An interest group, several landowners and six Texas counties sued to reverse the Federal Railroad Administration’s approval of Texas Central Railroad’s proposed high-speed rail between Houston and Dallas.

Rock Ridge Construction Management claims in court that hockey star Ilya Kovalchuk, formerly of the New Jersey Devils, owes $184,000 after backing out of a $1.2 million project on his property in Alpine, N.J.

John A. Santilli Jr. was arrested Tuesday on federal charges alleging he defrauded investors of the “Magic Mike Live” show at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas out of $4.2 million.

Environmental groups claim in federal court that the Army Corps of Engineers’ approval of a massive pumping plant that would drain Mississippi wetlands was based on a flawed environmental analysis rejected by the EPA.

More News

Places

Though the shores of the Dead Sea — at more than 1,300 feet below sea level — have it beat for lowest land elevation in the world, the salt flats on the Badwater Basin in Death Valley, California, — 282 feet below sea level — are at the top, or bottom, if you prefer, of the list for the United States. Death Valley does hold the record for hottest recorded temperature in the history of the world. Furnace Creek Ranch reached 134.1 degrees Fahrenheit on July 10, 1913. Furnace Creek had the second hottest day ever too, when the temperature peaked at 129.9 degrees Fahrenheit on August 16, 2020. The April day in 2011 when this picture was taken didn’t break any records. But at more than 100 degrees, it was still hot. (Courthouse News photo / Chris Marshall)