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Florida is the latest GOP-controlled state to place more restrictions on mail-in ballots in the aftermath of the 2020 election.

by ALEX PICKETT

Colorado faces a fourth wave of Covid-19 infections driven by highly infectious variants and loosening restrictions.

by AMANDA PAMPURO

Flooding in Himalayan communities caused by overflowing glacial lakes could triple in the coming decades because of global warming.

by DUSTIN MANDUFFIE

by NICHOLAS IOVINO

A delay in redistricting data from the U.S. Census Bureau has thrown the constitutionality of Virginia’s House of Delegates races into question.

by BRAD KUTNER

Accusing a New York jurist of “bias” and “pre-ordained favoritism” in favor of comedian Sacha Baron Cohen, famed conservative attorney Larry Klayman did not show up on Thursday for a remote appearance before that judge.

by JOSH RUSSELL

Science & Research

Research shows sharks navigate extraordinarily long trips using the Earth’s magnetic fields.

by SABRINA CANFIELD

New technology has allowed paleontologists to identify five more fossils of the rare Besanosaurus hidden right in their own museums.

by MADELINE REYES

Pandemic

The lawsuit follows a federal judge’s order Wednesday striking down a nationwide moratorium on evictions during the Covid-19 pandemic.

by NINA PULLANO

Vote-by-mail ballots were sent to all California registered voters during the pandemic ahead of the 2020 general election.

by NATHAN SOLIS

International Courts

With an advocate general condemning Poland’s judicial overhaul, the European Union’s top court got a step closer to stopping Poland from punishing judges who are critical of what they see as a judicial takeover orchestrated by the country’s ruling far-right government.

by CAIN BURDEAU

Dominic Ongwen is the first International Criminal Court defendant to have admitted to participating in some of the crimes with which he was charged. 

by MOLLY QUELL

Crime & Punishment

The Justice Department has seen a rise in ransomware and supply-chain attacks. Combating them won’t be easy.

by KAILA PHILO

Experts asked lawmakers to build an international coalition of support for the Uyghurs, increase tariffs on China and work to prevent U.S. companies from profiting off of forced labor.

by SAMANTHA HAWKINS

Across the Nation

Massachusetts continues a trend of targeting not just drugmakers but the companies that helped them to promote their sales.

by THOMAS F. HARRISON

A class of Google Assistant users claim the product listened in on their conversations in order to sell their data to targeted-advertising firms. 

by MATTHEW RENDA

Democratic aides say the GOP leadership jockeying is evidence of the Republican Party’s unwavering allegiance to Trump.

by JACK RODGERS

More than 10,000 California employers have registered for CalSavers since it launched in July 2019, and 340,000 workers are enrolled and putting away money for their retirements.

by NATHAN SOLIS

The surviving parents of a high school senior sued the school where he was shot and killed in 2019.

by AMANDA PAMPURO

The two protesters and a journalist say a Louisiana law that designates the thousands of miles of pipeline in the state as critical infrastructure has chilled their free speech rights.

by DANIEL JACKSON

Rulings

by KELSEY JUKAM

The Utah Supreme Court ruled that district courts have the authority to adjudicate sex-change petitions and ordered a lower court to grant two transgender individuals’ requests to change their legal sex designations on their birth certicates. 

The Fifth Circuit ruled that a lower court improperly accepted a defendant’s guilty plea to being a felon in possession of a firearm on the sole basis that he admitted to “having seen and touched” the revolver at a friend’s house.

In a ruling explaining its reasoning for ordering the New Mexico Secretary of State to mail absentee ballot applications to eligible voters ahead of the June 2020 primary election, the New Mexico Supreme Court said the action promoted public health while not infringing on the Legislature’s plenary power to establish election procedures.  

A federal court in California refused to grant summary judgment to brand and generic manufacturers of the type 2 diabetes drug Glumetza in an antitrust class action accusing the pharmaceutical firms of plotting to hike up the price of the drug. 

A federal court in California approved a class action settlement with Facebook relating to a coding error that allowed hackers to infiltrate the accounts of millions of users. Facebook agreed to make certain security commitments and consented to independent monitoring of its security measures. 

From the Walt Girdner Studio

Hot Cases

A federal judge who overturned the federal moratorium on evictions Wednesday entered a stay hours later, noting that landlords don’t face the irreparable injury since they benefit from the $46 billion in emergency rental assistance appropriated by Congress.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has agreed to unblock Twitter users who said the Republican official blocked them for comments they made about his felony indictment and his endorsement of former President Donald Trump’s unfounded election fraud claims.

Lacking the votes necessary to do anything else, a reluctant Federal Election Commission dropped its case into hush money paid to adult film star Stormy Daniels despite “well-grounded charges that the former president of the United States knowingly and willfully accepted contributions nearly 5,000% over the legal limit to suppress a negative story mere days before Election Day.”

Rapper Flo Rida filed a lawsuit in Florida state court alleging the maker of Celsius energy drinks has refused to pay him for promoting the product even after a surge in revenue attributed to the endorsement campaign.

Environmentalists claim the Army Corps of Engineers failed to conduct a proper environmental review before issuing permits for a massive power line that would be installed in Wisconsin’s Driftless Area National Wildlife Refuge.

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Places

Unlike many art masterpieces that fail to wow when seen in real life, Michelangelo’s David lives up to every expectation — and then some. The 17-foot marble legend of Renaissance sculpture, created between 1501 and 1504, was originally commissioned as one of a series of prophets to line the roofline of Florence’s cathedral but was ultimately placed outside the Palazzo Vecchio, the seat of Florentine government. It now occupies a pedestal of honor at the Galleria dell’Accademia. At the time of its creation, Florentines saw David as a symbol of their independent city-state, under constant threat from more powerful rival states around them. In fact, while at the Vecchio. David’s eyes cast a warning glare fixated toward Rome. (Courthouse News photo / William Dotinga)