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Manafort Jailed Ahead of Trial Over Witness Tampering

By BRITAIN EAKIN

A federal judge agreed Friday to jail former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort for witness tampering ahead of trial.

- Mueller Outlines Evidence to Be Used in Manafort Trial

Files From Cohen Shredder, Encrypted Apps Restored by Feds

By ADAM KLASFELD

Prosecutors reconstructed more than a dozen pages of shredded documents and obtained hundreds of encrypted messages from President Donald Trump’s embattled personal attorney Michael Cohen, they announced Friday.

Judge Denies Cohen Bid to Silence Avenatti

By MARTIN MACIAS JR

A federal judge on Friday denied a request by President Donald Trump’s personal attorney Michael Cohen to prevent porn star Stormy Daniels’ lawyer from speaking to the press, finding Cohen did not show the need for immediate relief.

California State Appeals Court Reinstates Right-to-Die Law

By NATHAN SOLIS

A California appellate court temporarily reinstated the state’s End of Life Option Act on Friday, which allows terminally ill patients to receive physician-assisted suicides.

‘Monkey Selfie’ Photographer Supports Letting Animals Sue

By NICHOLAS IOVINO

A nature photographer who was sued over the ownership of “monkey selfie” photos is now asking the Ninth Circuit not to abolish the right of animals to take people like him to court.

U.S. Mexicans' Impact on Mexican Election Likely Minimal

By BRAD POOLE

Although one out of every 10 Mexicans lives in the U.S. – roughly 13 million people – experts say these immigrants will have little impact on Mexico’s July 1 presidential election.

OPINION

Kahns on Pez

By ROBERT KAHN

I don’t want to disturb your slumber. In fact, you can go back to sleep unless you remember Pez. If you remember Pez, read on. You will also find information about glass-blowing.

More Teens Report Feelings of Fear and Despair

By MATT REYNOLDS

While American high school students are less sexually active and are doing fewer illicit drugs, a growing number are feeling hopeless and reporting suicidal thoughts, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Citibank to Pay $100 Million in Multistate Settlement

By HELEN CHRISTOPHI

Citibank will pay $100 million in a multistate action to settle claims it manipulated a key interest rate during the global financial crisis that resulted in massive losses to investors, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced Friday.

EPA Told to Speed Up Investigation Into Pruitt’s Conduct

By BRANDI BUCHMAN

A federal watchdog wants the Environmental Protection Agency to pick up the pace on its investigations into Administrator Scott Pruitt’s ballooning list of ethics violations before it can recommend “corrective action” to President Donald Trump.

Read Thursday's Nightly Brief Here

Asylum Change Said to Condemn Abuse Survivors

By BRANDI BUCHMAN

Soldiers raped Stephanie because her husband, a pastor called Alain, preached to men in their Congo town about the need for education. Her ordeal ended when she was granted asylum by the United States. But for another group of women wanting to emigrate here, victims of domestic violence, that route of escape was closed by the Trump administration this week.

Doctors Line Up Against Texas Bid to Kill Obamacare

By DAVID LEE

Leading health care and physicians groups and five law professors joined 16 Democratic states Thursday in asking a federal court to throw out Texas’ attempt to kill Obamacare for alleged unconstitutionality after Congress removed the individual mandate tax penalty.

Abortion Groups Challenge Dozens of Texas Laws

By KELSEY JUKAM

A coalition of Texas nonprofits and healthcare providers filed a sweeping challenge Thursday to a myriad of Texas laws that restrict abortion access, asking a federal court to strike down the state’s “dizzying array of medically unnecessary requirements.”

Judge Advances Racist Lending Lawsuit

By LACEY LOUWAGIE

A lawsuit accusing Wells Fargo of violating the Fair Housing Act by offering predatory loans to minority homebuyers will advance, a federal judge ruled Friday.

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EPA Can’t Dodge Suit Over Toxic Pesticide Ingredients

NICHOLAS IOVINO

White Ex-Mayor Can Challenge Race-Based California Districts

BIANCA BRUNO

Imagine this: The white ex-mayor of a wealthy city in Southern California, which is just 1.4 percent black, complains that he was placed in a racially gerrymandered district when the city went from at-large to district voting for City Council. You need not imagine it: the Ninth Circuit reversed dismissal and remanded the case this week.

Grand Jury Access Denied to Indicted Russian Firm

BRITAIN EAKIN

One of the Russian companies indicted by special counsel Robert Mueller failed Friday to secure a federal judge’s review of grand jury instructions.

Judge Rules Cross in Public Park Unconstitutional

HELEN CHRISTOPHI

A 20-foot, electrically-illuminated cross that has stood in a public park in Albany, California for nearly five decades is unconstitutional and must be removed or the land sold, a federal judge ruled Friday.

Bill Cosby Ousts Legal Team Ahead of Sex Assault Sentencing

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bill Cosby arrives for his sexual assault trial on April 25, 2018, at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

Bill Cosby has ousted the high-powered defense team whose aggressive tactics failed to sway jurors from convicting him of sexual assault in April.

NIH Ends Alcohol Study, Citing Funding, Credibility Problems

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The U.S. government is shutting down a study that was supposed to show if a single drink a day could prevent heart attacks, saying ethical problems with how the research was planned and funded undermine its credibility.

NATIONAL

FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2017, file photo, a barista pours steamed milk in a coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Elihu Berle issued his final decision Monday, May 7, 2018, that Starbucks and other coffee companies failed to show that benefits from drinking coffee outweighed any risks. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)

California Moves to Declare Coffee Safe From Cancer Risk

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Theranos Founder, Ex-President Accused of Defrauding Investors

MATTHEW RENDA

Elizabeth Holmes, founder of biotech firm Theranos, and the company’s former president and chief operating officer were indicted on fraud charges Friday, accused of lying about the reliability of its portable blood testers.

Conservative Ad Backer Hurdles DC Circuit Appeal

TIM RYAN

An outfit that spent millions promoting Republican politicians, but billed itself as a public-welfare organization to avoid taxes, avoided charges Friday thanks to a 2-1 ruling from the D.C. Circuit.

NCAA Settles CTE Lawsuit Filed by Widow of Texas Player

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Footballs

The NCAA settled a lawsuit Friday with the family of a former University of Texas football player that accused the organization of being responsible for his brain injuries and death decades after his playing career.

DHS Reports 2,000 Minors Separated From Families

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nearly 2,000 children have been separated from their families at the U.S. border over a six-week period during a crackdown on illegal entries, according to Department of Homeland Security figures obtained Friday by The Associated Press.

China Hikes Tariffs on US Soybeans, Electric Cars, Fish

ASSOCIATED PRESS

China fired back Saturday in a spiraling trade dispute with President Donald Trump by raising import duties on a $34 billion list of American goods including soybeans, electric cars and whiskey.

INTERNATIONAL

FILE- In this Jan. 30, 2018, file photo, a ship to shore crane loads two shipping containers together onto a vessel at the Georgia Ports Authority's Port of Savannah in Savannah, Ga. China's government renewed its threat Thursday, June 14, to scrap deals with Washington aimed at defusing a sprawling trade dispute as the White House prepared to release a list of Chinese goods targeted for tariff hikes. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton, File)

Trump Announces $50 Billion in Tariffs on China Imports

DAN MCCUE

Boris Becker Claims Diplomatic Immunity in Bankruptcy Case

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Retired German tennis star Boris Becker is claiming his unpaid role as a sports attache for Central African Republic gives him diplomatic immunity from bankruptcy proceedings in Britain.

Czech President Torches Underpants, Stuns Journos

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Milos Zeman announced a press conference for Thursday, but instead of briefing reporters, he had two firefighters in protective gear burn a huge pair of red underpants in front of them.

Stephen Hawking’s Ashes to be Buried in Westminster Abbey

ASSOCIATED PRESS
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2012 file photo, British physicist, Professor Stephen Hawking during the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 Paralympics in London.  Hawking will take his place among Britain's greatest scientists when his ashes are buried in Westminster Abbey, Friday June 15, 2018, between the graves of Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton, during a service of thanksgiving for the physicist who died in March 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Stephen Hawking will take his place among Britain’s greatest scientists when his ashes are buried in Westminster Abbey, between the graves of Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton.

2nd Suspect Charged in Ukraine Journalist Murder Plot

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ukrainian authorities have charged a second suspect for allegedly organizing a murder plot against a Russian journalist whose killing was faked last month.

Afghan Official: US Drone Kills Pakistan Taliban Chief

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A U.S. drone strike in northeastern Kunar province killed Pakistan Taliban chief Mullah Fazlullah, the insurgent leader who ordered the assassination of Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, an Afghan Defense Ministry spokesman said Friday.

In Brief

Walt Girdner, was born in central Iowa in 1922. He was one of five children. His father took a job as a Pastor in Alameda where the family moved and relocated to the Bay Area of California in 1925. Growing up during the great depression in the Bay Area was difficult. Walt struggled to make extra money to help out the family by taking on many different jobs.  Such jobs varied from working the corn fields and selling corn, to bucking hay bales and pulling double shifts at the cannery.

As a young man, he developed an interest in art and imagery.  He had faith that imagery was a powerful way to communicate and believed that young people are better at interpreting imagery than adults for their imaginations are more agile and unencumbered.

Tall and lanky as a teenager, Walt would often run the three miles to school.  He later became a high school champion in the quarter-mile and half-mile, and he would anchor the 440-relay. For his speed and endurance, he was offered a track scholarship to Stanford University and recruited for the 1944 US Olympic Team before World War II erupted and cancelled the games.  He graduated in 1943 with a degree in psychology.