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US Ending Temporary Permits for 60,000 Haitians

By DAN MCCUE

The Trump administration announced late Monday night that  it is ending a temporary residency permit program that has allowed almost 60,000 citizens from Haiti to live and work in the United States since a powerful earthquake shook the Caribbean nation in 2010.

Lawyers Spar Over Immigrant Who Agreed to Leave US

By CAMERON LANGFORD

A Mexican woman being held in a Houston immigration jail despite agreeing to return to the country she left with her parents as an infant won a small victory Monday when a federal judge said she should get a bond hearing to lobby for her release.

History-Making Delegate Ready to Tackle Down-to-Earth Issues

By BRAD KUTNER

Weeks after becoming the first openly transgender person to be elected to the Virginia Legislature, Danica Roem is keeping promises and preparing legislation ahead the Virginia General Assembly’s upcoming session.

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A lion yawning near the National Parks sanctuary in Zimbabwe. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)

Feds Sued Over Plan to Lift Big-Game Hunting Trophy Ban

The Trump administration’s rollback – and nearly immediate flip-flop – of a ban on importing big-game trophies from Zimbabwe has sparked outrage, confusion and a lawsuit filed Monday by the Center for Biological Diversity.

HBO Hack Targeted 'Game of Thrones,' Feds Say

By ADAM KLASFELD

Winter may be coming for an Iranian government hacker charged on Tuesday with swiping unaired “Game of Thrones” episodes in a bid to extort the cable network HBO.

Report: Sugar Group Killed Study of Health Effects

By SEAN DUFFY

In a blistering new report that harkens back to Big Tobacco’s glory days, scientists accuse a U.S. sugar industry trade group of downplaying and discontinuing research on animals that would have linked sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago.

FCC Proposes Death of Net-Neutrality Rules

By BRANDI BUCHMAN

Targeting an Obama-era regulation that bars internet service providers from offering slower connection speeds to different customers, the Federal Communications Commission said Tuesday it will soon unveil a proposal killing net neutrality.

Tribe Fights County for More Police Power

By DIONNE CORDELL-WHITNEY

The Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe claims in court that a Minnesota county is violating federal law by preventing its tribal law enforcement body from using police powers on its reservation.

US ECONOMY

Home Sales Up Across Entire US in October

By DAN MCCUE

Americans bought more homes in October, the market heating up to a level not seen since early summer, the National Association of Realtors said Tuesday.

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