CNS

California Governor Gavin Newsom ordered much of California to shut down again Monday, including indoor service at restaurants statewide and churches and hair salons in 30 hard-hit counties as the novel coronavirus wreaks havoc across the Golden State.

by CARSON MCCULLOUGH

The Texas Supreme Court on Monday rejected the state Republican Party’s petition for an order to let it hold its in-person convention this week in Houston despite a surge in coronavirus cases.

by CAMERON LANGFORD

Primary Season

As the Democratic Party fights for control of the U.S. Senate in November, Tuesday’s Maine primary could give some valuable clues on what to expect.

by THOMAS F. HARRISON

Polish voters on Sunday narrowly re-elected a nationalist conservative president and delivered a bitter blow to liberals in Europe who fear that Poland is drifting away from democracy and becoming a threat to the stability of the European Union.

by CAIN BURDEAU

Students and teachers in Los Angeles will not return to the classroom next month as the novel coronavirus infections continue to spike across the region.

by NATHAN SOLIS

Florida’s coronavirus cases swelled again Monday, a day after the state reported a record-breaking number of new cases, prompting Democratic lawmakers to criticize Republican Governor Ron DeSantis’ response to the public health crisis.

by ALEX PICKETT

Column

MILT POLICZER

These are frightening times and they don’t get less frightening when you see something like this: “A message to the legal profession: We will not forget how you treated us during the global pandemic.”

Political Winds

Breaking apart from every other U.S. circuit court, a federal appeals court that President Trump flipped last year cleared the way Monday for the Justice Department to withhold grant money from sanctuary jurisdictions.

by ADAM KLASFELD

by NICHOLAS IOVINO

U.S. prosecutors made a passionate plea for victims of sexual abuse Monday, the day before Jeffrey Epstein’s former girlfriend and accused co-conspirator Ghislaine Maxwell heads to court.

by ADAM KLASFELD

by ANDY MONSERUD

Across the Nation

The Environmental Protection Agency said Monday it will retain ozone standards set in 2015 after a mandatory five-year review, drawing cheers from industry groups and boos from environmentalists who want tougher standards.

by BRAD KUTNER

Seventeen states and the District of Columbia brought a massive federal complaint Monday over the Trump administration’s new rule requiring foreign students to take classes in person, not just online, to stay in the country during the coronavirus pandemic.

by THOMAS F. HARRISON

by EMILEE LARKIN

Already the subject of countless news reports and book reviews, Mary Trump’s memoir “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man” has been blessed for publication on the eve of its release.

by ADAM KLASFELD

Clarifying the terms of Roger Stone’s get-out-of-jail-free card, the Justice Department on Monday released President Donald Trump’s order of clemency for the convicted political strategist.

by MEGAN MINEIRO

Responding to July 9 sanctions by the Trump administration, the Chinese government announced sanctions Monday against four U.S. officials, including Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz.

by TIM RYAN

Science and Research

Farmers are facing a tough decision in the face of climate change: Deal with low yields from the crops they depend on, or plant drought-resistant strains that leave them prone to income instability.

by DUSTIN MANDUFFIE

In Brief

by ROBERT KAHN

Florida sued Jacksonville, the Republican National Committee and the Trump campaign in Duval County Court, claiming their plans to hold the Republican Convention in a Jacksonville arena during the Covid-19 pandemic will be “a nuisance injurious to the health, welfare and property rights … of the community of Jacksonville.”

Addressing a federal judge’s concerns over the adequacy of a $550 million settlement of privacy claims against Facebook, plaintiffs in the case said the risks of litigation and concerns the law on biometric data will be gutted mean the settlement is the best outcome.

A class action in Orange County Court, Calif., claims R.J. Reynolds Tobacco discriminates against Black and homosexual employees by, among other things, “advising employees, such as the plaintiff, that they work for a ‘conservative company’ based in North Carolina and that the gay lifestyle is ‘offensive’ not only to plaintiff’s teammates but also management and those in leadership position.”

Diné [Navajo] Citizens Against Ruining Our Environment sued the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and Interior Secretary David Bernhardt in federal court, claiming its authorization and issuance of oil and gas leases on 30 parcels covering nearly 41,000 acres violates the National Environmental Policy Act and Federal Land Policy and Management Act.

The United States sued J.R. Simplot Co. and Simplot Phosphates for years of environmental violations at its fertilizer plant near Rock Springs, Wyoming.

From the Walt Girdner Studio

Carriers-WG

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From Walt Girdner’s Africa collection

Rulings

by KELSEY JUKAM

The Ninth Circuit upheld the dismissal of First Amendment and Equal Protection claims against University of California officials brought by a woman whose plans to attend a speech by far-right political commentator Milo Yiannopoulos at UC Berkeley were thwarted by protests. The woman’s battery claim against one of the protesters, however, was improperly dismissed.  

The Second Circuit upheld a ruling in favor of the CIA in a Freedom of Information Act suit brought by The New York Times, which sought an acknowledgement from the agency that it was aware of the existence of records relating to a covert program of arming and training Syrian rebels. 

In a class action antitrust dispute, a federal court in California preliminarily approved a $232 million settlement between purchasers of capacitors and tech companies Panasonic, AVX, Holy Stone, Kemet, Shinyei, Shizui, ELNA and Taits. 

The Weather Channel’s parent company’s breach of contract suit against The Nielsen Company is unlikely to succeed on its merits, a federal court in Illinois ruled, denying a motion for a preliminary injunction. The parent company, CF Entertainment, believes it only needs to pay Nielsen $41,667 a month for ratings services instead of the $475,000 a month it has been paying. 

A federal court dismissed a case against the Texas Secretary of State brought by a voter and the state’s Democratic Party, which challenged a state election law governing the order in which candidates appear on the ballot. The plaintiffs had asked the court to require the state to use a ballot order system that would have given major party candidates an “equal opportunity to be listed first on the ballot.”

Places

The U.K. Parliament building at sunset. (William Dotinga / CNS)