Petitions

A federal court in California dismissed a class action that claimed Change.org misused money donated to a petition supporting the prosecution of police officers who killed George Floyd. The contribution screen clearly stated the money would be used to advertise the petition to other Change.org supporters, in addition to advertising on external billboard, social media posts and emails.

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Police Shooting

The Ninth Circuit upheld a ruling in favor of a Los Angeles police officer who shot and killed a 14-year-old boy. Although a member of the jury in this excessive force case was in social media groups that closely followed law enforcement activity, and didn’t disclose that fact, such an affiliation “would not have provided a basis for a challenge for cause.”

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Immunity

Three sheriff’s deputies indicted on felony murder and other charges for tasing a Black man to death were improperly granted immunity, the Georgia Supreme Court ruled. A homeowner called 911 after the man requested a drink of water on a hot day. The man proceeded to walk down the street after he was denied a drink. The court ruled there was “no legal basis” to detain the man for loitering.

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Death in Custody

The family of Javier Ambler, a Black man who died in the custody of Williamson County, Texas, sheriff’s deputies in 2019 sued the county, alleging its officers were encouraged to “perform their jobs recklessly to produce more ‘entertaining’ video” for a since-canceled reality television program called Live PD. Body camera footage showed that as officers restrained him, Ambler repeatedly told them: “I can’t breathe.”

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Facebook Comments

The Sixth Circuit revived a former Emergency Medical Services captain’s retaliation suit in which he claimed he was dismissed after making incendiary comments on his private Facebook page about the police killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice. A district court will have to address whether the captain’s free speech interests outweigh the interest of Cleveland EMS.

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