Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including more than 3,100 inmates will be released from federal custody as a result of sentencing changes made in the sweeping criminal-justice reform bill that became law in December; The Second Circuit ruled that New York City did not give a fair hearing to taxi drivers whose licenses were suspended after criminal arrests; The Dutch Supreme Court upheld the Netherlands’ liability for the deaths of hundreds of Muslim men killed in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre but reduced the amount of potential compensation for victims’ families, and more.

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National

(Patrick Breen/The Arizona Republic via AP)

1.) More than 3,100 inmates will be released from federal custody Friday as a result of sentencing changes made in the sweeping criminal-justice reform bill that became law in December.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

2.) President Donald Trump can intervene in a case that seeks to lift the shroud over his tax records, a federal judge ruled.

(AP Photo/File)

3.) Fifty years ago the world stopped to watch in awe as Apollo 11 astronauts walked on the moon. The semi-centennial has rekindled NASA’s interplanetary ambitions. Tapping into a vibrant U.S. space industry, it’s eyeing the moon as a stepping stone to Mars.

(AP Photo/Matthew Brown)

4.) After the Trump administration gave hardrock-mining companies a pass on proving their financial ability to tackle cleanup costs in the event of a spills, the D.C. Circuit shot down a challenge Friday to force the regulatory change.

Regional

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

5.) Reviving a suit by taxi drivers who endured license suspensions after criminal arrests, the Second Circuit ruled Friday that New York City did not give the drivers a fair hearing, as is due with their very livelihoods on the line.

(Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

6.) Former “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett continues to assert that he was a victim in his hate crime fiasco, arguing in court papers filed Friday that an Illinois judge should not have ruled to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate how his criminal case was handled.

(AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

7.) An Iowa judge dismissed a lawsuit brought by two transgender Iowans and a gay rights advocacy group challenging the constitutionality of a law that exempts sex-change operations from coverage under the state’s Medicaid program.

International

(AP Photo/Staton R. Winter)

8.) The Dutch Supreme Court on Friday upheld the Netherlands’ liability for the deaths of hundreds of Muslim men killed in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, but reduced the amount of potential compensation for victims’ families.

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