Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the professor who accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were both in high school asking the Senate Judiciary Committee to delay a hearing on the allegations planned for next week; President Donald Trump breaks his silence on former campaign advisor Paul Manafort who last week pleaded guilty to lobbying-related charges; the U.S. Supreme Court allows a federal judge’s decision requiring more disclosure from super PACs to go into effect, overruling an earlier move by Chief Justice John Roberts; an en banc Ninth Circuit reverses a federal judge’s dismissal of consolidated labor violation lawsuits filed by servers and bartenders who said employers underpaid them for non-tipped tasks; the European Court of Justice rules Britain’s looming exit from the European Union does not delegitimize an arrest warrant executed on that country’s behalf for a man accused of rape, murder and arson; a new study suggests the Great Dying, a cataclysmic period 252 million years ago during which more than 90 percent of sea creatures and 70 percent of land vertebrates went extinct, may have taken place over only a few thousand years, and more.

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National

In this Sept. 6, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

1.) The professor who accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were both in high school asked the Senate Judiciary Committee Tuesday night to delay a hearing on the allegations planned for next week so the FBI can conduct an investigation into her claims.

President Donald Trump talks to media before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, for the short trip to Andrews Air Force Base en route to Havelock, N.C. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

2.) During a scrum with reporters outside of the White House Wednesday morning, President Donald Trump broke his silence on former campaign advisor Paul Manafort who last week pleaded guilty to lobbying-related charges in a federal courtroom in Washington.

The Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)

3.) The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday allowed a federal judge’s decision requiring more disclosure from super PACs to go into effect, overruling an earlier move by Chief Justice John Roberts to block the lower court order.

Oil pumps and natural gas burn off in Watford City, N.D., June 12, 2014. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

4.) The Trump administration finalized plans Tuesday to unwind regulations aimed at preventing methane from leaking into the atmosphere.

Regional

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5.) The en banc Ninth Circuit on Tuesday reversed a federal judge’s dismissal of consolidated labor violation lawsuits filed by servers and bartenders who said employers underpaid them for non-tipped tasks such as cleaning toilets and maintaining soft drink dispensers.

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6.) The Sixth Circuit ruled Wednesday that cereal giant Kellogg must arbitrate a dispute over contract bonuses brought by a union representing “casual” employees who fill in for full-time workers.

New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood. (Associated Press)

7.)  Describing meals containing hair and flies, and advertisements for a high school that is not actually accredited, New York’s attorney general is urging a court upstate to shut down a program that purports to train young basketball players with dreams of playing professionally.

Science

Artist interpretation of a mass extinction event at the end of the Permian period. (MIT)

8.) The Great Dying, a cataclysmic period 252 million years ago during which more than 90 percent of sea creatures and 70 percent of land vertebrates went extinct, may have taken place over only a few thousand years, according to a study published Wednesday in the Geological Society of America Bulletin.

International

Poland’s European Affairs Minister Konrad Szymansk, right, speaks with European Commission Vice President Frans Timmermans during a meeting of General Affairs ministers at the Europa building in Brussels, Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018. Ministers on Tuesday debated a rule of law procedure against Poland. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

9.) In Poland, demonstrators are dressing famous statues in a white T-shirt with a single word emblazoned on them: “Constitution.” It’s a protest over a deepening constitutional conflict, where the ruling nationalist right-wing party is accused of tightening an authoritarian grip on the country’s judicial system.

The chambers of the European Court of Justice.

10.) Britain’s looming exit from the European Union does not delegitimize an arrest warrant executed on that country’s behalf for a man accused of rape, murder and arson, the EU’s top court ruled Wednesday.

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