Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including a federal jury in northern Virginia finding former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort guilty of hiding millions of dollars in offshore accounts and lying to bankers to get loans; President Donald Trump’s longtime fixer Michael Cohen pleads guilty to federal charges; Trump dossier author Christopher Steele and a London-based corporate intelligence company win the dismissal of defamation claims from three Russian businessmen; the Environmental Protection Agency moves to scale back Obama-era constraints on coal-fired power plants, to “empower states, promote energy independence, and facilitate economic growth and job creation;” driven by the scarcity of supply, climate change and ground watershed depletion, scientists present a design for a first of its kind portable harvester that mines freshwater from the atmosphere; white storks that have nested in Poland are heading south for the winter earlier than usual after an especially hot, dry summer, a development experts are linking to climate change, and more.

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National

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

1.) A federal jury in northern Virginia found former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort guilty Tuesday of hiding millions of dollars in offshore accounts and lying to bankers to get loans.

Michael Cohen pleaded to eight charges in total, including five counts of tax evasion, one count of making a false statement to a financial institution, one count of unlawful corporate contributor and one count of excessive campaign contribution.

2.) Ramping up pressure on the White House over Russia’s tampering with the 2016 U.S. election, President Donald Trump’s longtime fixer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty this afternoon to federal charges.

Highlighted pages from the Steele dossier.

3.) Trump dossier author Christopher Steele and a London-based corporate intelligence company won the dismissal Monday of defamation claims from three Russian businessmen.

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4.) The Treasury Department imposed a fresh round of sanctions Tuesday against Russian actors it believes are trying to evade U.S. pushback against Kremlin-ordered cyberattacks.

Sammi LeMaster helps to dismantle a large alarm clock display that reads “Net Neutrality Wake Up Call” from the stage after a protest at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, where the FCC is scheduled to meet and vote on net neutrality. The vote scheduled today at the FCC, could usher in big changes in how Americans use the internet, a radical departure from more than a decade of federal oversight. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

5.) Defending the Obama-era policy that bars internet service providers from interfering in download speeds, nearly two dozen state attorneys general urged the D.C. Circuit to block the rollback of net neutrality.

Regional

In this July 27, 2018 photo, the Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

6.) The Trump administration announced Tuesday that is scaling back Obama-era constraints on coal-fired power plants, to “empower states, promote energy independence, and facilitate economic growth and job creation.”

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin speaks to a joint session of the General Assembly at the Capitol in Frankfort, Ky. (Associated Press)

7.) Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin does not have legal standing to sue Medicaid recipients who challenged the state’s requirements that people work to receive benefits, a federal judge ruled Monday.

Science

(Photo: Chris Marshall, Courthouse News Service)

8.) Driven by the scarcity of supply, climate change and ground watershed depletion, scientists on Tuesday will present a design for a first of its kind portable harvester that mines freshwater from the atmosphere.

International

Reich leader Heinrich Himmler greets officers and recruits at the SS Training Camp in Trawniki, Poland on July 19, 1942. The X in the photo marks -SS First Lieutenant Johann Schwarzenbacher. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.)

9.) U.S. officials announced the deportation Tuesday of a former Nazi labor camp guard who participated in one of the largest single massacres of the Holocaust.

A stork walks on a field in the early morning near Bierun, Poland, on Aug. 24, 2017. Storks that have nested in Poland for the summer are heading south for the winter earlier than usual this year, and ornithologists believe the change is related to climate change. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski, file)

10.) White storks that have nested in Poland are heading south for the winter earlier than usual after an especially hot, dry summer, a development experts are linking to climate change.

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