Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the Senate Judiciary Committee approving five nominees to federal district courts across the country; Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and FBI Director Christopher Wray coming under intense questioning about the agency’s conduct during the 2016 presidential campaign; five people are killed in a shooting at the offices of the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Maryland; New York’s highest court backs health agencies for mandating that children who attend New York City-regulated or school-based programs get a flu shot; wild horse advocates sue Bureau of Land Management over a plan to remove wild horses from tracts of land in rural Nevada; a new study finds climate change could drive mason bees in the American Southwest to extinction as the global average temperature continues to rise; the EU’s highest court hands athletic apparel company Puma a victory in its trademark fight with a German manufacturer, and more.

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National

In this image from video from Senate Television, Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., speaks on the Senate floor Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, at the Capitol in Washington. (Senate TV via AP)

1.) The Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday approved five nominees to federal district courts across the country, but Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz, continued to block a vote on nominees for the Third and 11th circuits as a protest against a number of White House policies.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, right, and FBI Director Christopher Wray, left, arrive to testify before a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 28, 2018, on Justice Department and FBI actions around the 2016 presidential election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

2.) Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and FBI Director Christopher Wray came under intense questioning Thursday about the agency’s conduct during the 2016 presidential campaign during a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee.

Maryland police officers patrol the area after multiple people were shot at at The Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Md., Thursday, June 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

3.) Five people were killed and several others were gravely injured Thursday in a shooting at the offices of the Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Maryland. The alleged shooter has been taken into custody, police said.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks to members of law enforcement Friday, April 28, 2017, in Central Islip, N.Y. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

4.) In what Attorney General Jeff Session called the biggest health care fraud enforcement action in U.S. history, the Justice Department said Thursday that it charged 601 people in dozens of cases involving opioid prescriptions.

Regional

A young woman shows off her flu shot after receiving vaccine at a local drug store. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

5.) The state’s highest court backed New York City health agencies on Thursday for mandating that children who attend city-regulated or school-based programs get a flu shot.

Parisa Sadrzadeh, center, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event for Amazon to announce a new program that lets entrepreneurs around the country launch businesses that deliver Amazon packages. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

6.) A government transparency watchdog claims in court that Minnesota has refused to hand over a copy of its unsuccessful proposal for Amazon’s second corporate headquarters.

A wild horse grazes. (Photo via Pixabay)
7.) Wild horse advocates sued Bureau of Land Management Wednesday over a plan to remove wild horses from tracts of land in rural Nevada.

Science

Northwestern’s Paul CaraDonna painted artificial nests with black, white or transparent paint to simulate warming, cooling or control, respectively. (Paul CaraDonna, Northwestern University)

8.) Climate change could drive mason bees in the American Southwest to extinction as the global average temperature continues to rise, according to a new study of the bee’s nests.

9.) In the future, there will be new technologies that have not been conceived of today, but humans must still step up efforts toward zero-emissions standards or face difficult consequences from climate change, according to a paper by scientists from a variety of fields.

International

10.) Corrado Rodio walks outside the thick stone walls of his family’s ancient olive oil mill and farmstead, the Masseria Brancati, and strolls over to a 2,000-year-old olive tree at the farm’s entrance. “It was planted by the Romans,” he says. But will it survive a catastrophic disease that’s spread north and now is only a few miles away from Rodio’s farm? Rodio doesn’t think his trees will be spared.

Sibanye includes this image of its mining operations in Driefontein, South Africa, on its website.

11.) A world leader in gold mining recorded its 21st death this year because the South African company puts profits ahead of safety, Sibanye Gold Limited shareholders said Thursday in a federal class action.

Germany-based Puma brought a challenge in 2013 when Gemma Group attempted to register its sign of a big cat pouncing (top) with the European Intellectual Property Office. At bottom left and right, signs that Puma has continuously renewed since registering them in 1983 and 1992, respectively.
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