Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump signing an executive order ending his administration’s controversial policy of separating families at the U.S. border with Mexico; the president also revoked an Obama-era executive order establishing protections for oceans, coastlines and lakes; the artist who created the iconic piece claims “The Bean” sculpture in Chicago’s Millennium Park was used without permission in a National Rifle Association recruitment video; siding with anti-gentrification activists, San Francisco officials delay the construction of an eight-story housing development in a historically Latino neighborhood; CNS takes a look at Palermo, Sicily, a jewel of the Mediterranean once known as the “city of the Mafia,” and more.

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National

President Donald Trump signs an executive order to keep families together at the border, but says that the ‘zero-tolerance’ prosecution policy will continue, during an event in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, June 20, 2018. Standing behind Trump are Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, left, and Vice President Mike Pence. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

1.) President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending his administration’s controversial policy of separating families at the U.S. border with Mexico.

Cumulus clouds over the Atlantic Ocean. (Photo by Tiago Fioreze via Wikipedia Commons)

2.) President Donald Trump on Tuesday revoked an Obama-era executive order establishing protections for oceans, coastlines and lakes, and replaced it with a new order that curbs environmental protections while promoting economic growth and border security.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Jay Richardson arrives at the federal courthouse in Charleston, S.C., Monday, Nov. 7, 2016. (Associated Press)

3.) Two of President Donald Trump’s nominees to seats on the Fourth Circuit had an easy hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, promising lawmakers they would remain independent and fair if confirmed to the federal bench.

Former Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, right, and White House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson, left, watch as President Donald Trump talks with a patient during a VA “telehealth” event in Washington. (Associated Press)

4.) In a move expected to raise premiums under the federal health care law, President Trump cleared the way Tuesday for small businesses to form “skinny” health insurance plans.

Regional

5.) The artist who created the iconic piece claims “The Bean” sculpture in Chicago’s Millennium Park was used without permission in a National Rifle Association recruitment video that he says calls for violence against liberals and the news media.

The Women’s Building in the Mission District of San Francisco. Street murals and paintings of Latin American culture by local artists are a common feature and attraction. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

6.) Siding with anti-gentrification activists, San Francisco officials on Tuesday delayed the construction of an eight-story housing development in a historically Latino neighborhood, a move some critics say will exacerbate the city’s housing crisis.

7.) A former Jones Day partner sued the country’s largest law firm Tuesday, claiming she was fired for speaking up about a pay disparity for women and misogynist behavior that allegedly included requiring female partners to “disrobe” in front of clients at a spa day event.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks to members of law enforcement Friday, April 28, 2017, in Central Islip, N.Y. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

8.) Calling for the chance to elect town board representatives by district, Latinos living in Islip, New York, brought a federal complaint to overhaul the town’s at-large voting system.

Correspondence between a state university professor and a nonprofit associated with the payday lending industry is to, be made public. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

9.) The Georgia Supreme Court ruled that correspondence between a state university professor and a nonprofit associated with the payday lending industry can be made available to the public.

International

Palermo’s Corso Vittorio Emmanuele was recently turned into a street made for bicycles and pedestrians. (Photos by Cain Burdeau/CNS)

10.) The “City of the Mafia”? Yes and no. But in many ways, Palermo, a jewel of the Mediterranean, can say it’s no longer ruled by the mob.

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