Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump cancelling his planned June 12 summit meeting with Kim Jong Un, citing the “tremendous anger and open hostility” of the North Korean leader’s most recent statements regarding the United States; the Senate Judiciary Committee advances six of President Donald Trump’s judicial nominations, including one to the Fifth Circuit; Republican businessman John Cox gaining ground on Democratic frontrunner Gavin Newsom in California’s gubernatorial race; Wyoming this fall will launch a trophy hunt of grizzly bears, its first in 44 years; the California Supreme Court will decide the constitutionality of the state’s money bail system, granting review to the case of Kenneth Humphrey, whose $350,000 bail led to an appellate court ruling requiring judges to consider a person’s ability to pay when setting bail; Europe’s human right court upholds the criminal conviction of a now-defunct Danish TV network whose license was revoked for broadcasting what Denmark said was terrorism-friendly programming, and more.

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National

A copy of the letter sent to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un from President Donald Trump canceling their planned summit in Singapore is photographed in Washington, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/J. David Ake

1.) President Donald Trump on Thursday cancelled his planned June 12 summit meeting with Kim Jong Un, citing the “tremendous anger and open hostility” of the North Korean leader’s most recent statements regarding the United States.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo answers questions from the Senate Foreign Relations Committee just after President Donald Trump canceled the June 12 summit with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un, citing the “tremendous anger and open hostility” in a recent statement from North Korea, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

2.) Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told members of the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee Thursday that he was involved in the discussions that led to President Donald Trump’s decision to pull out of a planned summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

The Senate Judiciary Committee split along party lines Thursday to approve the nomination of Andrew Oldham, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott’s chief legal adviser, to the powerful 5th Circuit Court of Appeals. (Screen capture via Senate Judiciary Committee)

3.) The Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday advanced six of President Donald Trump’s judicial nominations, including one to the Fifth Circuit who faced opposition from Democrats and liberal groups over his work advocating conservative legal causes in court.

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Regional

California gubernatorial candidate John Cox speaks at a public event at the University of San Francisco on March 1, 2018. (Maria Dinzeo, Courthouse News Service)

5.) Fresh off an endorsement from President Donald Trump, Republican businessman John Cox is gaining ground on Democratic frontrunner Gavin Newsom in California’s gubernatorial race.

A grizzly bear roams near Beaver Lake in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. (AP Photo/Jim Urquhart, File)

6.) Wyoming this fall will launch a trophy hunt of grizzly bears, its first in 44 years. On Wednesday, the commission overseeing the Wyoming Game and Fish Department voted 7-0 to approve a hunt of up to 22 grizzlies outside Yellowstone and Teton National Parks–despite receiving more than 185,000 public comments opposing the hunt after it was proposed in March.

The Ronald Reagan State Building, the California Supreme Court’s branch office in Los Angeles, which it shares with the Court of Appeal for the Second District. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

7.) The California Supreme Court will decide the constitutionality of the state’s money bail system, granting review late Wednesday to the case of Kenneth Humphrey, whose $350,000 bail led to an appellate court ruling requiring judges to consider a person’s ability to pay when setting bail.

A marijuana bud before harvesting at a rural area near Corvallis, Ore. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky, File)

8.) Stubbing out a student’s conviction for pot possession, the Arizona Supreme Court found it unconstitutional Wednesday to prosecute registered users of medical marijuana for carrying the drug on college campuses.

Science

9.) At the very least, astronauts will need a sense of humor to handle living up to three years in an RV-sized spacecraft on journey to Mars, according to a paper published in American Psychologist, the flagship journal of the American Psychological Association.

Research & Polls

Fort Point National Historic Site and the Golden Gate Bridge, California. (Maria Caffrey, University of Colorado, via the National Park Service)

10.) The National Park Service predicted in a new study that sea levels will rise up to two feet before the end of this century, jeopardizing America’s coastal national parks and monuments.

International

11.) A now-defunct Danish TV network slapped with a criminal conviction and license revocation for broadcasting what Denmark said was terrorism-friendly programming lost its challenge at Europe’s human rights court, which ruled Thursday the broadcasts were propaganda and not protected speech.

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