Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including attorneys for Paul Manafort facing an uphill battle in trying to argue that the government conducted an unconstitutional search on the former Trump campaign manager’s storage unit; a federal judge rules President Donald Trump’s Twitter account isn’t a Constitution-free zone; a former Georgia state solicitor general and current state Supreme Court judge assures senators she is mindful of the difference between a judge and advocate and promised to make that transition fully if confirmed to the 11th Circuit; former Georgia House minority leader Stacey Abrams won the Democratic primary in Georgia’s gubernatorial race Tuesday, becoming the first black woman to be a major party candidate for governor in America; the Ninth Circuit berates a district court judge as it overturned a series of lower court decisions bringing clarity to a complex water rights issue in northern Nevada; conservationists petition the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on to ban two chemicals found in sunscreen that are known to irreparably damage coral reefs; researchers at the University of Tokyo finds rice grown in an environment with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide has fewer nutrients, and more.

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National

Paul Manafort walks into the Alexandria Federal Courthouse on Friday, May 4, 2018, in Alexandria, Va., with his wife Kathleen Manafort, left, and Kevin Downing, attorney for Manafort. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)

1.) Attorneys for Paul Manafort faced an uphill battle Wednesday in trying to argue that the government conducted an unconstitutional search on the former Trump campaign manager’s storage unit.

White House adviser Jared Kushner speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

2.) A lawyer for President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, Jared Kushner, said her client has been interviewed a second time by Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team.

President Donald Trump’s Twitter feed on a computer screen in Washington. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)

3.) President Donald Trump’s Twitter account isn’t a Constitution-free zone, a federal judge ruled on Wednesday.

In this Wednesday, May 9, 2018, photo provided on Thursday, May 10, 2018, by the North Korean government, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, poses with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un for a photo during a meeting at the Workers’ Party of Korea headquarters in Pyongyang, North Korea. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)
4.) Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told members of the House Foreign Affairs committee Wednesday that talks with North Korea in June are still on track but the U.S. won’t hesitate to leave negotiations if Kim Jong Un reverses course from plans to denuclearize the peninsula.

Regional

Democratic candidate for Georgia Governor Stacey Abrams waves to supporters after speaking at an election-night watch party Tuesday, May 22, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

7.) Former Georgia House minority leader Stacey Abrams won the Democratic primary in Georgia’s gubernatorial race Tuesday, becoming the first black woman to be a major party candidate for governor in America.

8.) The Association of American Railroads sued Kentucky to protect its right to block road crossings, despite criminal citations and protests in a small town whose residents say trains block them for hours at a time.

The Walker River near Leavitt Meadows. (Photo by Dcrjsr via Wikipedia Commons)

9.) The Ninth Circuit berated a district court judge as it overturned a series of lower court decisions on Tuesday, bringing clarity to a complex water rights issue in northern Nevada.

A roll of stickers awaiting distribution to early voters sits on a table at a check-in station. (AP Photo/Kelly P. Kissel)

10.) Backed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio, 16 Democratic voters sued Governor John Kasich and other Republican lawmakers on Wednesday, claiming the GOP manipulated the congressional map to such a degree that it no longer reflects the political will of Ohioans.

11.) Viacom has established trademark rights to the fictional restaurant The Krusty Krab where animated chef SpongeBob SquarePants is known for dishing out tasty burgers, the Fifth Circuit affirmed Tuesday, so an aspiring restaurateur cannot use the name for seafood diners.

Science

Deep sea coral and fish [photo credit: Papahanaumokuakea National Monument]
12.) Ahead of a long weekend where millions will flock to beaches around the United States, conservationists petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday to ban two chemicals found in sunscreen that are known to irreparably damage coral reefs.

Some examples of coprolites (fossilized poop) from the Early Cretaceous period in the La Hoya region of Spain. (Sandra Barrios-de Pedro, Francisco José Poyato-Ariza, José Joaquín Moratalla, Ángela D. Buscalioni)

13.) A trove of ancient fossils in central Spain has given scientists clues about the behaviors and diets of long-extinct animals, according to a study published Wednesday.

Rice within the octagon in this field is part of an experiment started by a University of Tokyo professor and designed to grow rice under different atmospheric conditions. (Dr. Toshihiro HASEGAWA/National Agriculture and Food Research Organization of Japan)

14.) Rice grown in an environment with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide has fewer nutrients, according to research started by the University of Tokyo.

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