Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including an attorney who found himself in the crosshairs of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election pleading guilty to lying to federal authorities; Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas berates his colleagues for rejecting a challenge by gun owners to California’s 10-day “cooling-off” period; a federal judge ordering federal regulators to re-evaluate the environmental impacts of a popular California water program that allows farmers to sell water to parched southern cities and water districts during droughts; the Sierra Club and local environmental groups claim the Environmental Protection Agency’s approval of drastically lower standards for dissolved oxygen in 31 Louisiana rivers will allow for more sewage to be dumped in the water, and more.

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National

Alex van der Zwaan, second from left, arrives at Federal District Court in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

1.) An attorney who found himself in the crosshairs of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election pleaded guilty Tuesday to lying to federal authorities about his contacts with a former Trump campaign associate.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas (Charles Dharapak, Associated Press)

2.) Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas berated his colleagues Tuesday for rejecting a challenge by gun owners to California’s 10-day “cooling-off” period.

The Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

3.) The Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered Wyoming to pay Montana $20,000 for holding back some of the water that flows from the Yellowstone River into a reservoir in southeastern Montana.

A bump stock is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah, on Oct. 4, 2017. The controversial device was used in the Las Vegas shooting, allowing a semi-automatic rifle to mimic a fully automatic firearm. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

4.) President Donald Trump announced Tuesday that he’s directed Attorney General Jeff Sessions to craft regulations to “ban all devices” like bump stocks used in last year’s Las Vegas massacre that left 58 people dead.

Regional

The Delta viewed from above Sherman Island, with the Sacramento River above and San Joaquin River below.

5.) A federal judge ordered federal regulators to re-evaluate the environmental impacts of a popular California water program that allows farmers to sell water to parched southern cities and water districts during droughts.

6.) Unveiled by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court after state lawmakers failed to revise gerrymandered election districts, the new maps sparked applause by nonpartisan experts but GOP outrage Tuesday.

7.) The Sierra Club and local environmental groups claim the Environmental Protection Agency’s approval of drastically lower standards for dissolved oxygen in 31 Louisiana rivers will allow for more sewage to be dumped in the water.

Science

Oheka Castle, also known as the Otto Kahn Estate, is located on the North Shore of Long Island, in the West Hills section of Huntington, NY. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

8.)  A study released Tuesday suggests that that state of one’s health in adulthood is tied to economic stability in childhood.

Research & Polls

Students released from a lockdown are overcome with emotion following a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. (John McCall/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

9.) In the wake of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 dead, half of Americans say they support a nationwide ban on assault rifles like the AR-15 style carbine used by the shooter, according to a new poll.

International

In this photo taken March 24 , 2017, a bison stands near felled trees in the Bialowieza Forest, Poland.  (AP Photo/Adam Bohdan, File)

10.) In the latest salvo in the battle to save what’s left of an ancient forest that once covered the European plain, an EU magistrate said Tuesday that Poland’s logging plans violate EU law by causing irreparable harm to the breeding sites of protected species.

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