Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump revealing he will shrink two national monuments in Utah; Arizona Senator Jeff Flake’s withdrawal from the 2018 race is likely to lead to an in-state Republican free-for-all that will stretch well into next year; a state appeals court holds a jury was not unduly influenced or confused by evidence of the nation’s opioid epidemic when it a hit a St. Louis doctor and hospital with $15 million in punitive damages for overprescribing painkillers; researchers analyzing the fossils of a small, feathered dinosaur found that it used multiple types of camouflage to both avoid predators and sneak up on its prey, and more.

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Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke enjoys a horseback ride in the Bears Ears National Monument with local and state representatives in Blanding, Utah. (Scott G Winterton/The Deseret News via AP, File)

1.) In National news  virtually all federal energy policies will be overhauled, as will “burdensome” environmental protections, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke said this week in a report on how he will “streamline” domestic energy production.

A bucket-wheel excavator stands on lignite. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, file)

2.) In yet another signal of the Trump administration’s departure from the previous administration’s environmental policies in favor of robust fossil fuel development, President Donald Trump nominated a former mining engineer to run the Interior Department Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement.

The two buttes that make up the namesake for Utah’s Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune/AP)

3.) President Donald Trump told a Utah senator that he will shrink two national monuments in the state during a phone call Friday morning.

4.) Some of the nearly 3,000 newly released declassified records on the Kennedy assassination will remain under wraps for at least six months pending review, but the CIA said Thursday night that “every single one” of its records will be unveiled eventually, with “less than 1 percent” of the information redacted.
Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., a frequent critic of President Donald Trump, announced on Oct. 24, he won’t seek re-election. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

5.) In Regional news  Arizona Senator Jeff Flake’s withdrawal from the 2018 race is likely to lead to an in-state Republican free-for-all that will stretch well into next year.

6.) Thirty-one people say they suffered breathing problems and insomnia for more than two months as a smoldering fire at a wood-pellet shipping plant enveloped their southeast Texas neighborhood in smoke.

An arrangement of pills of the opioid oxycodone-acetaminophen in New York. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)

7.)  A jury was not unduly influenced or confused by evidence of the nation’s opioid epidemic when it a hit a St. Louis doctor and hospital with $15 million in punitive damages for overprescribing painkillers to a man suffering from chronic back pain, a Missouri appeals court ruled this week.

Sinosauropteryx in the likely open habitat in which it lived, 130 million years ago in the Early Cretaceous. (University of Bristol)
8.) From the world of Science comes word that researchers analyzing the fossils of a small, feathered dinosaur have found that it used multiple types of camouflage to both avoid predators and sneak up on its prey, much like some mammals and birds living today.
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