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Top eight today

Top eight stories for today including U.S. pressure forced Poland's president to veto a law targeting a Discovery-owned news outlet; Americans’ approval of the Supreme Court is declining but they still have faith in the chief justice; New York City must make all of its crossing signals accessible to blind and low-vision pedestrians by 2036, and more.

National

Why do Americans approve of Roberts but not his court?

Chief Justice John Roberts of the U.S. Supreme Court has achieved a near anomaly in modern politics, according to poll numbers published Monday that suggest Americans are craving even the appearance of moderation on an increasingly radical court. 

Chief Justice John Roberts sits during a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, April 23, 2021. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

TikTok content moderator sues over nightmares, panic attacks from graphic content

A TikTok content moderator sued the social networking platform claiming she suffers from horrific nightmares and panic attacks because of the videos of graphic violence and sexual assaults she has to watch for her job.

The TikTok app icon is seen on a smartphone screen. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

Ninth Circuit judge questions fairness of $9 million for privacy groups in Google Street View settlement

After ordering Google to pay privacy rights groups $9 million from a $13 million settlement over data collected by its Street View cars, a Ninth Circuit judge said her colleagues should rethink the practice of distributing the fruits of hard-fought class actions to charitable organizations and nonprofits in place of direct payments to class members.

Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Regional

Judge orders 10-year plan to make NYC crosswalks accessible

New York City must make all of its crossing signals accessible to blind and low-vision pedestrians by 2036, a federal judge ruled Monday. 

An Israeli child plays with an embedded LED stoplight at a crosswalk in Tel Aviv, Israel, on March 13, 2019. Tel Aviv has taken its first steps to assist pedestrians distracted by their smartphones by embedding LED stoplights at crosswalks. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)

San Francisco Board of Supervisors vote in favor of mayor’s emergency declaration over drug use

At a special session Thursday that extended into early Friday morning, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors ratified Mayor London Breed’s public health emergency declaration concerning rampant, open air drug use in the city’s Tenderloin neighborhood.

A man lies on the sidewalk beside a recyclable trash bin in San Francisco on April 26, 2018. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

International

Polish president vetoes controversial media ownership law

Facing stiff pressure from the United States and growing economic turmoil at home, Poland's president on Monday vetoed legislation that critics said sought to silence an American-owned television channel opposed to the ruling right-wing government in Warsaw.

Poland's President Andrzej Duda speaks during a news conference with North Macedonia's President Stevo Pendarovski in Skopje, North Macedonia, on Nov. 19, 2021. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski, File)

Science

Human remains recovered from ancient volcanic eruption

Scientists have dug up the first recorded human remains from the ancient Thera volcano eruption, one of the largest eruptions in human history that many historians say fundamentally changed the course of the world.

Excavated skeleton of a victim killed by a tsunami generated by the eruption of the volcano Thera in about 1600 B.C. (Photo by Vasıf Şahoğlu)

Opinion

Pointless punishment

If you want to punish someone for ignoring orders, does it make sense to issue more orders? No, it doesn't.

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