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Top Eight

Top eight stories for today including Texas is sending more than 500 National Guard troops to the state’s southern border with Mexico; Jurors in the criminal trial of a reporter arrested while covering a Black Lives Matter protest in Iowa heard conflicting testimony; A new lawsuit says students in New York City’s public school system are among the most segregated in the country, and more.

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top eight stories for today including Texas is sending more than 500 National Guard troops to the state’s southern border with Mexico; Jurors in the criminal trial of a reporter arrested while covering a Black Lives Matter protest in Iowa heard conflicting testimony; A new lawsuit says students in New York City’s public school system are among the most segregated in the country, and more.

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National

1.) A law professor testified at a Senate Banking Committee hearing Tuesday that market volatility in reaction to retail traders has thrown into question the long-term health of the stock market.

FILE - Pedestrians pass a GameStop store on 14th Street at Union Square, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021, in the Manhattan borough of New York. The GameStop saga has been portrayed as a victory of the little guy over Wall Street giants but not everyone agrees, including some lawmakers in Washington. The House Financial Services Committee is ready to dig into the confounding episode at a hearing on Thursday, Feb. 18. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

2.) German automaker Daimler, parent company of American Mercedes-Benz, will pay $1.5 billion to resolve charges over its connection to the global diesel emissions-cheating scandal following approval of the settlement Tuesday by a federal judge.

(Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay via Courthouse News)

Regional

3.) Texas is sending more than 500 National Guard troops to the state’s southern border with Mexico, officials said Tuesday, part of a broader policing surge launched in response to a recent uptick in the number of asylum-seekers and other migrants entering the U.S.

FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 19, 2007 file photo, a National Guard unit patrols the Arizona-Mexico border in Sasabe, Ariz. On Friday, April 6, 2018, Arizona and Texas announced that they were preparing to deploy National Guard members to the U.S.-Mexico border in response to President Donald Trump’s call for more border security. From 2006 to 2008, the Guard fixed vehicles, maintained roads, repaired fences and performed ground surveillance. Its second mission in 2010 and 2011 involved more aerial surveillance and intelligence work. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, file)

4.) Jurors in the criminal trial of a reporter arrested while covering a Black Lives Matter protest in Iowa last May heard conflicting evidence from witnesses Tuesday on whether she resisted or interfered with the arresting officer.

Des Moines Register reporter Andrea Sahouri listens to opening statements in her trial in which she is charged with failure to disperse and interference with official acts while reporting on a protest last summer, Monday, March 8, 2021, at the Drake University Legal Clinic, in Des Moines, Iowa. (Kelsey Kremer/The Des Moines Register via AP)

5.) A Latino voting rights group filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging Iowa’s controversial new voting regulations.

FILE- In this Jan. 12, 2021, file photo Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds greets Iowa House Speaker Pat Grassley, right, after delivering her Condition of the State address before a joint session of the Iowa Legislature at the Statehouse in Des Moines, Iowa. Iowa Democrats are beginning to consider changes to their get-out-the-vote plans under the assumption that Reynolds will sign into law a Republican-backed bill that makes it harder to vote early, potentially eroding a key aspect of Democratic campaigns. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

6.) In a city as diverse as New York, home to country’s largest public-school system, a lawsuit filed Tuesday says students are among “the most segregated in the country.”

In this Oct. 29, 2020 photo, students at West Brooklyn Community High School listen to questions posed by their principal during a current events-trivia quiz and pizza party in the school's cafeteria in New York. The school recently reopened after a three-week shutdown due to coronavirus cases in the neighborhood. It caters to students who haven't done well elsewhere, giving them a chance to graduate and succeed. (AP Photo/Kathy Willen, File)

International

7.) If copyright holders take steps to prevent their works from being embedded on third-party websites, doing so violates European Union law, the bloc’s top court ruled Tuesday. 

The European Court of Justice in Luxembourg. (Molly Quell/Courthouse News)

8.) On-call time can count as working time, but only occurring regularly and saddling the employee with severe restrictions, the EU’s high court held on Tuesday.

(Image by nerami30 from Pixabay via Courthouse News)

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