Speed the Primary Cause in Tiger Woods Crash

The world-famous, professional golfer sustained serious leg injuries in a February car crash in the Rolling Hills Estates community of Los Angeles County.

In this aerial image take from video provided by KABC-TV video, a vehicle rest on its side after a rollover accident involving golfer Tiger Woods along a road in the Rancho Palos Verdes section of Los Angeles on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021. (KABC-TV via AP)

(CN) — Los Angeles County officials chalked up the Feb. 23 vehicle crash involving Tiger Woods to speed, revealing the pro golfer was going nearly twice the speed limit when he rolled his SUV.

Woods sustained serious leg injuries in the car accident in the Rolling Hills Estates community of LA County and later underwent surgery.

Emergency rescue personnel used a fire ax and a tool known as the “jaws of life” to extricate Woods, 45, from his SUV.

LA County Sheriff Alex Villanueva told reporters in a virtual briefing Wednesday investigators determined Woods was driving between 84 and 87 miles per hour before the crash and 75 miles per hour when he struck a tree before plunging down a hillside.

Villanueva said there was no sign that Woods was impaired and no citation was issued.

“We’re thankful he survived this tragic collision,” Villanueva said, adding that he refutes public speculation the golfer received special treatment from his department. “Our primary concern at the scene of the collision was his safety.”

Responding to questions of whether deputies administered a toxicology test to Woods or sought one, Villanueva said there was no probable cause to seek a warrant to do so and that there was no evidence the pro golfer was driving recklessly. 

LASD Capt. James Powers told reporters there was also “no need” to determine whether Woods may have been distracted due to texting while driving because the primary cause of the crash was speed.

Surveillance video capturing Woods both entering his vehicle and getting on to the road before the crash showed the pro golfer acting and driving normally, Powers said.  

“There’s no evidence of increased speed or rushed behavior,” Powers told reporters.

Powers also said there were no narcotics or open bottles in Woods’ car or in his possession at the time of the crash.

Woods’ 2021 Genesis SUV rolled over the side of Hawthorne Boulevard and down a hillside about 30 miles south of downtown LA. Helicopter footage from the crash site showed Woods’ vehicle was on its side with its airbags deployed.

Woods’ agent, Mark Steinberg, told news outlets after the crash his client suffered multiple, serious leg injuries requiring intensive surgeries.

The Feb. 23 crash is not Woods’ first incident involving a vehicle.

In May 2017, he was found asleep in his car in a traffic lane in Jupiter Island, Florida, by local police. He later pleaded guilty to reckless driving.

Woods turned pro at the age of 20, breaking color barriers in the sport. He went on to win the Masters Tournament at the age of 21. Woods’ name has become synonymous with golf and he stands as one of the top leaders among the PGA Tour.

Woods has been in LA recovering from his fifth back surgery and has told media outlets he was working to be back on the links in time for the Masters tournament this month.

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