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Nightly Brief

Top CNS stories for today including U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions suing California to stop hours-old legislation being called the strongest net neutrality law in the nation; a small frog creates a big stir on the first day of oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court as a divided court grapples with how far the federal government can go to protect the habitat of an endangered creature; a federal judge denies a request by environmental groups and scientists who believe immigration causes climate change to review seven immigration statutes; the U.S. Supreme Court rejects hearing the case of a California billionaire trying to make the state pay to use his property as a beach-access point; the Seventh Circuit rules the National Labor Relations Act does not allow local municipalities to pass right-to-work laws; a new study fines more Americans in their 50s and 60s believe DNA testing is a boon to many, but is also fueling anxiety; the United Nations’ highest court rejects landlocked Bolivia’s bid to force Chile to the negotiating table over granting access to the Pacific Ocean, and more.

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions suing California to stop hours-old legislation being called the strongest net neutrality law in the nation; a small frog creates a big stir on the first day of oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court as a divided court grapples with how far the federal government can go to protect the habitat of an endangered creature; a federal judge denies a request by environmental groups and scientists who believe immigration causes climate change to review seven immigration statutes; the U.S. Supreme Court rejects hearing the case of a California billionaire trying to make the state pay to use his property as a beach-access point; the Seventh Circuit rules the National Labor Relations Act does not allow local municipalities to pass right-to-work laws; a new study fines more Americans in their 50s and 60s believe DNA testing is a boon to many, but is also fueling anxiety; the United Nations’ highest court rejects landlocked Bolivia’s bid to force Chile to the negotiating table over granting access to the Pacific Ocean, and more.

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National

1.) Wasting little time after California Gov. Jerry Brown signed landmark internet protections for consumers, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Sunday night sued to stop hours-old legislation being called the strongest net neutrality laws in the nation.

2.) A small frog created a big stir at the Supreme Court Monday, where Justices weighed how far the federal government can go to protect the habitat of an endangered creature, even if that creature may never call that habitat home.

3.) A federal judge on Sunday denied a request by environmental groups and scientists who believe immigration causes climate change to review seven immigration statutes for possible violations of the National Environmental Policy Act.

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4.) Among a list of dozens of cases rejected Monday by the Supreme Court is that of a California billionaire trying to make the state pay to use his property as a beach-access point.

5.) More than 200 Democratic lawmakers can move forward with a lawsuit against President Donald Trump claiming that his private business dealings with foreign governments violate the Constitution, a federal judge ruled Friday.

Regional

6.) Creating a circuit split, the Seventh Circuit ruled Friday that the National Labor Relations Act does not allow local municipalities to pass right-to-work laws.

7.) A gun group wasted no time filing an appeal Friday after its challenge to new New Jersey limits on large-capacity magazines failed to secure an injunction.

8.) Elon Musk and Tesla will each pay $20 million to settle securities fraud charges, and Musk will resign as Tesla chairman for 3 years, for tweeting in August that he had the financing to take Tesla private for $420 a share, though he had nothing of the kind, the SEC announced Saturday.

9.) The D.C. Circuit grappled Friday with whether a student artist suffered discrimination when his contest-winning art was removed from the U.S. Capitol complex.

10.) A French atheist living in Massachusetts lost her court battle Friday to strike the phrase “so help me God” from the U.S. citizenship oath.

Research & Polls

11.) The wide availability of DNA testing has been a boon for people with an interest in their ethnic heritage or those who need to know more about their genetic risk to certain diseases. But while more Americans in their 50s and 60s are interested in genetic testing, many fear that learning too much could make them worry too much about the future, according to a new poll.

International

12.) The United Nations’ highest court rejected Monday landlocked Bolivia’s bid to force Chile to the negotiating table over granting access to the Pacific Ocean.

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