Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the Supreme Court ruling that Americans have reasonable privacy expectations in their cellphone location data; Paul Manafort fails to sway a federal judge that, even if he should have registered as a foreign agent, the pro-Russia lobbying work at issue cannot sustain the money-laundering count he faces; Special Counsel Robert Mueller asks a federal judge to place limits on how and in what context attorneys for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort can accuse the Justice Department of the “selective” or “vindictive” prosecution of their client; the Texas Supreme Court upholds an appeals court ruling that disallows local governments from banning single-use plastic bags, finding that state law bars ordinances restricting the sale or use of containers; Bay Area toll users will pay $34 million to settle a dispute with a contractor accused of doing defective work on the new eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge; a new study finds a voter-approved ballot measure aimed at reducing California’s prison population and ending racial disparities in the war on drugs has produced most of the cost-saving, equity-focused results it promised; the Supreme Court rules that companies can recover profits lost because of the unauthorized use of their patented technology overseas, and more.

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National

The Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

1.) With Chief Justice John Roberts leading the majority, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Friday that Americans have reasonable privacy expectations in their cellphone location data.

Paul Manafort arrives at Federal Court in Washington on June 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

2.) Paul Manafort failed to sway a federal judge Friday that, even if he should have registered as a foreign agent, the pro-Russia lobbying work at issue cannot sustain the money-laundering count he faces.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller departs after a meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

3.) Special Counsel Robert Mueller asked a federal judge on Friday to place limits on how and in what context attorneys for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort can accuse the Justice Department of the “selective” or “vindictive” prosecution of their client.

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch speaks in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

4.) By a razor-thin margin, an accused safe robber who cried double jeopardy after fighting to have the charges against him drawn out over two trials lost his Supreme Court battle Friday.

Debris circles the planet; the most concentrated area for orbital debris is found in low earth orbit, shown here. (Photo courtesy NASA)
6.) A Dallas investor accused of helping to advance conspiracy theories about the death of former Democratic National Committee staffer Seth Rich is asking for $57 million in damages in a defamation lawsuit against NPR and one of its reporters.
7.) Coinciding with the official release of the “Westworld” mobile game, Warner Bros. was hit with a federal complaint Thursday that says the game is a wholesale imitation, down to its bugs, of the mega-hit “Fallout Shelter.”

Regional

(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

8.) The Texas Supreme Court on Friday upheld an appeals court ruling that disallows local governments from banning single-use plastic bags, finding that state law bars ordinances restricting the sale or use of containers.

The illuminated San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge as seen from the Embarcadero.

9.) Bay Area toll users will pay $34 million to settle a dispute with a contractor accused of doing defective work on the new eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.

Research & Polls

Razor wire protects a perimeter of a correctional institution. (AP Photo/Sean Rayford, File)

10.) A voter-approved ballot measure aimed at reducing California’s prison population and ending racial disparities in the war on drugs has produced most of the cost-saving, equity-focused results it promised, with some exceptions, according to a study published Thursday.

An arrangement of pills of the opioid oxycodone-acetaminophen in New York. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)

11.) Health care insurers may have helped fuel the country’s growing opioid epidemic that claimed the lives of 42,000 Americans in 2016, a new study shows.

International

WesternGeco offices in Houston, Texas. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

12.) The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that companies can recover profits lost because of the unauthorized use of their patented technology overseas.

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