Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the White House announcing the Justice Department has asked the inspector general to expand an ongoing investigation to include any irregularities with the FBI or Justice Department’s activities regarding the Trump campaign; the Supreme Court took up a case where Virginia has barred mining companies from exploiting the country’s largest known uranium deposit; a sharply divided U.S. Supreme Court says employees do not have a right to class action relief; a newly discovered asteroid in Jupiter’s orbit “immigrated” from another solar system and is orbiting in the opposite direction of nearly everything else in our solar system; an Iowa man who was disciplined for having sexual relationships with two Chinese employees while working abroad for agricultural giant Deere & Co. cannot sue the company under state law, the Iowa Supreme Court rules, and more.

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National

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein arrives for a meeting at the White House, Monday, May 21, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

1.) The White House said Monday afternoon the Justice Department has asked the inspector general to expand an ongoing investigation to  include any irregularities with the FBI or Justice Department’s activities regarding the Trump campaign.

Geologic bedrock formations with naturally elevated background concentrations. (Source: State Geologic Map of Virginia)

2.) The Supreme Court took up a case Monday where Virginia has barred mining companies from exploiting the country’s largest known uranium deposit.

The Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)
3.) In its latest buttressing of corporate arbitration, the U.S. Supreme Court was sharply divided Monday in saying employees do not have a right to class action relief.

Regional

4.) The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday perpetuated a years-long fight between a couple and a Native American tribe over a single acre of land in Washington state, finding the Evergreen State’s high court must decide whether common law bars sovereign immunity for the tribe when real estate is involved.

Muscogee (Creek) Nation Mound building. Seat of government for both Legislative and Judicial branches of government (Photo by Rdlogan05 via Wikipedia Commons)

5.) The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether Oklahoma lacked jurisdiction to try a tribe member for murder based on 1866 territorial boundaries establishing a reservation in the eastern part of the state.

6.) What’s in the color of a lollipop bag? Quite a lot, according to the maker of Dum Dums.

Science

These are images of 2015 BZ509 obtained at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO) that established its retrograde co-orbital nature. The bright stars and the asteroid (circled in yellow) appear black and the sky white in this negative image. (C. Veillet/Large Binocular Telescope Observatory)

7.) A newly discovered asteroid in Jupiter’s orbit “immigrated” from another solar system and is orbiting in the opposite direction of nearly everything else in our solar system, according to new astronomical research.

8.) Bill Paseman has two choices for treating his rare and deadly kidney cancer: do nothing or let 200 scientists from around the world analyze his DNA to uncover clues for promising new treatments.

International

9.) An Iowa man who was disciplined for having sexual relationships with two Chinese employees while working abroad for agricultural giant Deere & Co. cannot sue the company under state law, the Iowa Supreme Court ruled Friday.

A Facebook logo being displayed in a start-up companies gathering at Paris’ Station F, in Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)

10.) Capping off a three-day summit on human rights, Facebook received a stern warning not to package its Russian manipulation crisis as a first-world problem.

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