Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo securing the release of three American detainees from North Korea; Gina Haspel, President Donald Trump’s nominee to head the Central Intelligence Agency, telling lawmakers that if confirmed, she would disobey directives she found immoral; six candidates for California governor face off against each other as the race to helm the Golden State intensifies ahead of the June 5 primary; a new report by Moody’s says legalization of marijuana efforts could create “opportunity” for spirits companies; a French court rules the Cannes Film Festival can screen Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” despite a request from the film’s producer that the showing be blocked, and more.

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National

Kim Dong-chul, Tony Kim and Kim Hak-song on TV news reports in Seoul, South Korea, this month. (Ahn Young-Joon/Associated Press)

1.) Secretary of State Mike Pompeo secured the release of three American detainees from North Korea Wednesday, saying they “seem to be in good health.”

CIA nominee Gina Haspel testifies during a confirmation hearing of the Senate Intelligence Committee, on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, May 9, 2018 in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

2.) Gina Haspel, President Donald Trump’s nominee to head the Central Intelligence Agency, told lawmakers Wednesday that if confirmed, she would not pledge a loyalty oath to Trump and would disobey directives she found immoral.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, (pictured right). (J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press)

3.) President Donald Trump’s nominee to the Ninth Circuit apologized  on Wednesday for the “overheated, overbroad” rhetoric in several op-eds he wrote about campus diversity efforts and racial issues while he was an undergraduate student at Stanford.

Regional

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley speaks during the annual State of the State address in Montgomery, Ala. (Brynn Anderson/AP)

4.) Alabama’s disgraced former governor Robert Bentley conspired with other state employees to defame a former finance official who was tasked with finding and delivering Bentley’s emails in response to a subpoena, the former official said in a lawsuit Tuesday.

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom addresses a Los Angeles County Democrats Central Committee meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 13. (Nathan Solis/Courthouse News)
5.) Six candidates for California governor faced off against each other as the race to helm the Golden State intensifies ahead of the June 5 primary in the first gubernatorial debate televised statewide.
Smoke and flames pouring from the Llewellyn shaft of the Consol No. 9 mine on November 20, 1968. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)
6.) Fifty years after their family members were killed in a West Virginia mining disaster, descendants of the 78 left dead pressed the Fourth Circuit Wednesday to allow them to hold the mine owner responsible.
7.) A Ford Motors expert on self-driving cars said Tuesday that the advent of autonomous vehicles could exacerbate traffic congestion and pollution unless the cars are electric and people share rides.

Science

8.) At face value, the Baltic Sea seems insignificant to the research pursuits of scientists investigating global ocean topics. It’s comparatively shallow, has a narrow connection to the North Atlantic and a low salinity. But these factors obscure the Baltic Sea region’s value as a model for future changes in the ocean, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Science Advances.

Research & Polls

A marijuana bud before harvesting at a rural area near Corvallis, Ore. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky, File)

9.) Dispelling concerns that America’s embrace of marijuana will hurt alcohol sales, a new report by Moody’s says legalization efforts could create “opportunity” for spirits companies here.

International

A still from Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.” (Courtesy of Cannes Film Festival)

10.) A French court on Wednesday ruled the Cannes Film Festival can screen Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” despite a request from the film’s producer that the showing be blocked.

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