Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the Supreme Court closing the book on terror-support claims against Arab Bank by foreigners whose families were maimed or killed in attacks on Israel; efforts by former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort to suppress evidence seized from his condo and a storage locker facing opposition from prosecutors; attorneys for two of the convicted Bridgegate defendants telling the Third Circuit that no laws were  broken when politically orchestrated lane closures on the George Washington Bridge caused horrific traffic jams; the Los Angeles City Council votes to overturn a policy barring city officials from traveling to Arizona;the nature journal reports on an enormous buildup of frozen plastic particles trapped in Arctic sea ice, and more.

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National

The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court.

1.) The Supreme Court closed the book 5-4 Tuesday on terror-support claims against Arab Bank by foreigners whose families were maimed or killed in attacks on Israel.

Judge Neil Gorsuch speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017, after President Donald Trump announced Gorsuch as his nominee for the Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

2.) With only Justice Neil Gorsuch and the chief aligned in dissent, the Supreme Court found nothing unconstitutional Tuesday about letting the Patent and Trademark Office review patent claims without court involvement.

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort arrives at federal court in Washington, Monday, Dec. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
3.) Efforts by former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort to suppress evidence seized from his condo and a storage locker faced opposition from prosecutors Monday night.
Vitamin C supplements at a drug store. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)
4.) The United States’ uncertain trade relationship with China was the backdrop for a Supreme Court hearing Tuesday on whether Chinese companies can be held liable for violating U.S. antitrust laws.

Regional

Shown at the trial of Bill Baroni and Bridget Ann Kelly, the government exhibit shows the traffic heading on to the George Washington Bridge in New Jersey.

5.) Attorneys for two of the convicted Bridgegate defendants told the Third Circuit on Tuesday that no laws were  broken when politically orchestrated lane closures on the George Washington Bridge caused horrific traffic jams in 2013.

The Wilshire Grand Center in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

6.) The Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to overturn a policy barring city officials from traveling to Arizona due to its passage of a controversial immigration law that has since been mostly struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court.

7.) A New York appeals court refused Tuesday to dismiss libel claims from a former New York Times reporter against the producers of a 2014 romantic-comedy.

8.) Protesters who face criminal charges for attempting to shut down two oil pipelines are allowed to present a “necessity defense,” a Minnesota Court of Appeals judge ruled Monday.

Science

9.) Photos of plastic clogging the world’s waterways and filling the stomachs of unfortunate sea birds and whales have become common in recent years, and on Tuesday the a nature journal reported on an enormous buildup of frozen plastic particles trapped in Arctic sea ice.

Research & Polls

10.) It was fear of losing status as a superpower, not economic problems, that led Americans to elect Donald Trump president, a University of Pennsylvania professor concluded after polling 1,200 voters.

International

The chambers of the European Court of Justice.

11.) The European Union Court of Justice ruled Tuesday that someone who has been tortured in their home country is eligible for asylum if they face a significant risk of being deprived of physical and psychological health care back home.

Survivors and relatives of 32 people killed at a catastrophic chemical plant explosion in southern Mexico have sued Fluor, of Irving, Texas,for negligence and gross negligence. (Associated Press)

12.) Survivors and relatives of 32 people killed at a catastrophic chemical plant explosion in southern Mexico have sued Fluor, the engineering and construction giant, accusing it of knowing about its “horrendous safety record” at the plant.

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