Updates to our Terms of Use

We are updating our Terms of Use. Please carefully review the updated Terms before proceeding to our website.

Tuesday, May 21, 2024 | Back issues
Courthouse News Service Courthouse News Service

Nightly Brief

Top CNS stories for today including the U.S. Supreme Court ruling unanimously that Americans injured in a 1997 Hamas suicide bombing cannot seize clay tablets and other Iranian artifacts to satisfy a $71 million judgment; a federal judge sparks division in the digital-media realm by finding that media outlets had violated a photographer’s copyright by embedding a tweet that contained his work; with a $2.7 billion voter-approved bankroll ready to be spent on new dams and water projects, a California state agency is being accused of sitting on the funds; Virginia lawmakers pass legislation intended to expand public access to court records; a new study finds the range of potential health benefits from drinking red wine might include protection against cavities and gum disease, and more.

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the U.S. Supreme Court ruling unanimously that Americans injured in a 1997 Hamas suicide bombing cannot seize clay tablets and other Iranian artifacts to satisfy a $71 million judgment; a federal judge sparks division in the digital-media realm by finding that media outlets had violated a photographer’s copyright by embedding a tweet that contained his work; with a $2.7 billion voter-approved bankroll ready to be spent on new dams and water projects, a California state agency is being accused of sitting on the funds; Virginia lawmakers pass legislation intended to expand public access to court records; a new study finds the range of potential health benefits from drinking red wine might include protection against cavities and gum disease, and more.

Sign up for CNS Nightly Brief, a roundup of the day's top stories delivered directly to your email Monday through Friday.

National

1.)  The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that Americans injured in a 1997 Hamas suicide bombing cannot seize clay tablets and other Iranian artifacts from the University of Chicago to satisfy a $71 million judgment.

2.)  An immigrant who was sentenced for illegal re-entry based on a miscalculated recommendation courted sympathy Wednesday from the Supreme Court.

3.)  A securities whistleblower must alert regulators to benefit from federal anti-retaliation protections, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday, dealing a blow to a man who reported issues internally.

4.) A divided Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that a federal statute governing how much prevailing prisoners must pay their lawyers is unambiguous, and that as a result, 25 percent of their judgment must be used to cover attorney’s fees before defendants have to pick up any of the cost.

5.) A federal judge sparked division in the digital-media realm by finding that media outlets had violated a photographer’s copyright by embedding a tweet that contained his work in a report about New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.

Regional

6.) With a $2.7 billion voter-approved bankroll ready to be spent on new dams and water projects, a California state agency is being accused of sitting on the funds.

7.) The Tennessee city of Chattanooga filed court papers to relinquish responsibility for the maintenance of a local Confederate cemetery, one of the latest developments in the national debate about monuments to the Confederacy and their place in modern society.

8.) The Virginia General Assembly Wednesday advanced legislation to expand public access to court records with bipartisan support after a local paper lost a lawsuit seeking information on sentencing disparities across the Commonwealth.

Science

9.) The range of potential health benefits from drinking red wine might include protection against cavities and gum disease, a new study finds.

International

10.) Financed by a oligarch who owns the Brooklyn Nets, three Russian athletes brought defamation claims Tuesday against the whistleblower who exposed their country’s doping program.

Categories / Uncategorized

Subscribe to Closing Arguments

Sign up for new weekly newsletter Closing Arguments to get the latest about ongoing trials, major litigation and hot cases and rulings in courthouses around the U.S. and the world.

Loading...