Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the Fourth Circuit upholding a stay of President Donald Trump’s executive order restricting travel from six predominantly Muslim countries;the Senate approving President Donald Trump’s first federal appeals court nominee, overcoming opposition from Democrats;a conservation group studying the last administration’s designation of five national monuments claims in federal court that its records demand has been gathering dust at the Interior Department, and more.

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Chief U.S. Circuit Judge Roger Gregory. He wrote the opinion that on Thursday dealt another blow to President Donald Trump’s revised travel ban. “Congress granted the president broad power to deny entry to aliens, but that power is not absolute. It cannot go unchecked when, as here, the president wields it through an executive edict that stands to cause irreparable harm to individuals across this nation,” Gregory wrote. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

1.) In National news the Fourth Circuit on Thursday upheld a stay of President Donald Trump’s executive order restricting travel from six predominantly Muslim countries.

Republican candidate for Montana’s only U.S. House seat, Greg Gianforte, sits in a vehicle near a Discovery Drive building Wednesday, May 24, 2017, in Bozeman, Mont. A reporter said Gianforte “body-slammed” him Wednesday, the day before the special election. (Freddy Monares/Bozeman Daily Chronicle via AP)

2.) Montanans vote in a special election Thursday to fill their lone congressional seat, a day after the GOP candidate in the tight race was charged with misdemeanor assault of a journalist.

3.) With federal prison populations having hit their lowest level in a decade under President Barack Obama, criminal-justice experts are grappling with the new administration’s push for tougher sentences.

In this May 18, 2006 file photo, Amul Thapar speaks in Lexington, Ky. The Senate has elevated a federal trial court judge to fill the first appeals court vacancy in more than a year. (AP Photo/Ed Reinke, File)

4.) The Senate on Thursday approved President Donald Trump’s first federal appeals court nominee, overcoming opposition from Democrats who believe the president is determined to tilt the philosophical-leaning of the federal judiciary to the right.

5.) In Technology news, the Fourth Circuit revived Wikimedia’s challenge to the National Security Agency’s collection of “upstream” data under section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

In this Jan. 30, 2017, photo, Rep. Karl Oliver, R-Winona, rear, listens to Reps. Sam Mims, R-McComb, foreground left, confer with Bryant Clark, D-Pickens, during the 2017 Legislature at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

6.) In Regional news, the Mississippi lawmaker who said “Nazi-ish” Louisiana officials should be lynched for taking down Confederate monuments in New Orleans has been sued. A black attorney wants state Rep. Karl Oliver made to read the biography “The Blood of Emmett Till” and write a book report on it.

7.) In Environmental news, a conservation group studying the last administration’s designation of five national monuments claims in federal court that its records demand has been gathering dust at the Interior Department.

8.) Inaction and indecision by the agency charged with protecting them may spell disaster for critically endangered red wolves, advocates claim.

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