Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump firing FBI Director James Comey after it was revealed assertions he made about the Hillary Clinton email investigation before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week were not true; environmentalist groups taking to the 10th Circuit to argue that it was their First Amendment right to collect water samples from public lands in Wyoming for ecological research.; attorneys for two former UC Davis scientists spar with a federal judge over the intellectual property rights to California’s wildly popular strawberries, and more.

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FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 3, 2017, before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing: “Oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.” (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

1.) In National news President Donald Trump fired FBI Director James Comey Tuesday evening after it was revealed assertions he made about the Hillary Clinton email investigation before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week were not true.

U.S. Cyber Command and the National Security Agency Director Adm. Mike Rogers testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, before the Senate Armed Services Committee. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

2.) Meanwhile,  Adm. Mike Rogers, director of the National Security Agency, told the Senate Armed Services Committee on Tuesday that US intelligence officials watched Russians hack France’s computer networks in advance of Sunday’s presidential election, and alerted their French counterparts before the hacks became public.

3.) A coalition of environmentalist groups took to the 10th Circuit to argue that it was their First Amendment right to collect water samples from public lands in Wyoming for ecological research.

4.) In New York, the Second Circuit appeal Tuesday of former SAC Capital executive Mathew Martoma, who was convicted of record-breaking insider trading, tests the strength of securities law — and a former U.S. attorney’s legacy.

5.) In Regional News, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said Tuesday he will not run for a second term, as he fights claims that he sexually abused teenage boys in the 1980s.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signed a so-called “sanctuary cities” ban that lets police ask during routine stops whether someone is in the U.S. legally and threatens sheriffs with jail if they don’t cooperate with federal immigration agents. (Marie D. De Jesus /Houston Chronicle via AP, File)

6.) Texas filed a pre-emptive lawsuit to have the state’s new ban on sanctuary cities ruled constitutional, but it didn’t stop a border town and county from suing back, calling the law unconstitutional and coercive.

7.) California-grown strawberries pull in $2.5 billion a year, and attorneys for two former UC Davis scientists sparred with a federal judge over whether the scientists or the nation’s top agricultural research school own the intellectual property rights to some wildly popular cultivars.

8.) And finally, seeking to clarify a blurry area of state labor law, the California Supreme Court noted that, while workers are entitled to one day of rest per work week, those who always work less than six hours per day and 30 hours per week are free to give up their day off if they and their employer agree.

 

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