Murder Charge in Homecoming Deaths

     STILLWATER, Okla. (CN) – The woman accused of killing four people by driving her car into Oklahoma State University’s homecoming parade is being held on $1 million bond and must submit to a psychological evaluation, a state judge ruled Monday.
     State District Judge Katherine Thomas ordered Adacia Avery Chambers, 25, held on four preliminary counts of second-degree murder. Appearing in for the hearing via video, Chambers was silent other than saying “yes” when asked if she could hear what was said. Prosecutors asked Judge Thomas for more time before formally charging Chambers. She could face up to 10 years in state prison for each count.
     In setting the high bond, the judge cited details from a probable cause affidavit filed Monday in Payne County Court. The 3-page document states that a gray Hyundai Elantra struck a police motorcycle at the Saturday morning parade, then plowed into a crowd near a crosswalk at an intersection.
     Killed at the scene were Marvin Lyle Stone, 65, Bonnie Jean Stone, 65, and Nikita Nakal, 23. Nash Lucas, 2, died later of his injuries.
     Chambers “admitted to having a history of suicidal attempts” when she was booked, and said “she was suicidal at the time of the incident but not at the time of booking,” the affidavit states.
     Chambers’ attorney, Tony Coleman in Oklahoma City, said Sunday that he “absolutely” rules out alcohol as a cause of the crash. He said Chambers “doesn’t remember a whole lot” about what happened and may have “blacked out.”
     “I did not smell alcohol on her body,” he told reporters at his law office. “She did not come off as someone who was coming off of a drunken stupor.”
     Coleman said that when he met with his client for an hour, he was “not satisfied that I was communicating with a competent” person. He cited “some history” of mental illness in Chambers’ past.
     “I am not a psychiatrist or psychologist; however, I am currently representing several [clients] with mental illnesses and in my opinion, Ms. Chambers suffers from a mental illness,” he said. “Exactly what type has yet to be determined.”
     Coleman filed a motion for psychological evaluation Monday, which the judge granted. Payne County District Attorney Laura Thomas asked for a two-week continuance, as a fifth victim is in a “fragile state,” which may result in additional charges, Tulsa World reported.
     “The evidence indicates Chambers consciously drove through a red light, around a police barricade, over a police motorcycle and further into a large crowd of highly visible, innocent people enjoying OSU homecoming day festivities,” Thomas said. “The acts alleged in the affidavit suggest this was a purposeful criminal act committed upon a large gathering of innocent men, women and children.”
     Michael Brose, executive director of Mental Health Association Oklahoma, wrote to attorneys on both sides Monday, asking them to “refrain from language” that may stigmatize people with mental illnesses or other health issues.
     “It is important in this early stage of your investigations for all public statements to refrain from language which may ultimately be false, inaccurate, stigmatizing or erroneous,” Brose wrote. “Any rush to judgment regarding causes, whether they be attributed to physical health, mental health, and/or substance abuse in the absence of actual facts obtained from toxicology reports and/or from qualified professionals is inappropriate, and could have negative impact to people living and working in recovery from diabetes, mental illness, substance abuse and/or other forms of health issues or disability.”

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