Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including residents of Louisiana’s predominantly African American “Cancer Alley” suing the state over a permit for the final leg of the Dakota Access Pipeline; a family in Cleveland, Mississippi, says the local school board appointed a white co-valedictorian rather than have their daughter stand alone onstage as the school’s first black valedictorian in its 110-year history; a federal jury on Thursday granted the U.S. government forfeiture of a 36-story skyscraper in midtown Manhattan tied to the Iranian government, and more.

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1.) In National news residents of Louisiana’s predominantly African American “Cancer Alley” have sued the state over a permit for the final leg of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which they say threatens their water supply and will block them from escaping during emergencies.

2.) Democrats on the House Natural Resources Committee say they don’t oppose oil and gas development on public lands. What they object to is the oil and gas industry calling the shots on how to manage lands  owned by all Americans.

3.) With Congress plotting the destruction of the Affordable Care Act, California lawmakers are railing against the Republicans’ substitute proposal, but killing their own plan for a single-payer system of universal health care.

4.) Entities that lent General Motors $1.5 billion before it went bankrupt cannot sue GM’s law firm, Mayer Brown, for accidentally cancelling the collateral on the loan, the Seventh Circuit ruled.

5.) In Regional news a family in Cleveland, Mississippi, says the local school board appointed a white co-valedictorian rather than have their daughter stand alone onstage as the school’s first black valedictorian in its 110-year history.

6.) The Fourth Circuit Thursday overturned a lower court ruling that had required the Environmental Protection Agency to prepare a report on how its regulations have effected employment in the coal industry.

This photo from the website of the now-defunct Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus shows Kenneth Feld (center-left) surrounded by members of the circus Clown College founded in 1968 by his father, Irwin Feld (center-right). Kenneth took over the company after Irwin died in 1984.

7.) A federal judge shot down a circus mogul’s request for more help from his insurer in covering the cost of a protracted and bitter legal battle with his estranged sister.

8.) In International news a federal jury on Thursday granted the U.S. government forfeiture of a 36-story skyscraper in midtown Manhattan tied to the Iranian government.
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