Nightly Brief

     

     Top CNS stories for today including Supreme Court blocks 11th-hour relief for Arizona voter advocates; from bankruptcies to Trump U: The effect of Trump’s legal woes on politics; Big money pouring into Montana Supreme Court race, and more.
     
      Sign up for CNS Nightly Brief, a roundup of the day’s top stories delivered directly to your email Monday through Friday.
     
     1.) Supreme Court Chucks 11th-Hour Relief for Arizona Voter Advocates
     Get-out-the-vote groups have used ballot collection since at least 2002, but if they do so Tuesday, they face up to a year in prison after the Supreme Court stayed an eleventh-hour injunction Saturday.
     
     2.) 2,000 Late Registrants Can’t Vote in Arizona
     Two thousand Arizonans who registered to vote the day after the Columbus Day deadline cannot vote on Tuesday, a federal judge ruled.
     
     3.) From Bankruptcies to Trump U: The Effect of Trump’s Legal Woes on Politics
     While the American people don’t yet know who will be elected the 45th president, legal and political science experts are weighing in about what Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s campaign — and the trail of litigation that has marked his rise to real estate mogul — mean for American politics going forward and, especially, what a Trump presidency could mean for the executive branch of government.
     
     4.) California Tax-Hike Extension on Rich Likely
     With a voter-approved income tax hike on California’s wealthiest set to expire in 2018, a coalition of the state’s most powerful labor unions is dumping millions into extending the tax for another decade.
     
     5.) Labor Board Nominations Go to High Court Again
     President Barack Obama’s appointment powers faced a new review by the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, two years after the justices curbed his response to congressional obstruction.
     
     6.) Obstacles Raise Voting Concerns in Some States
     More than a dozen states have enacted tougher requirements for registering and voting since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a key provision of the Voting Rights Act three years ago.
     
     7.) High Court Takes Up Settlement-Liens Spat
     The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide whether federal employees should face liens on their personal-injury settlement proceeds.
     
     8.) Big Money Pouring Into Mont. High Court Race
     The race for a Montana Supreme Court seat appears to be a repeat of 2014, when donations from outside organizations flooded into the state to oppose a sitting judge.

%d bloggers like this: