Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including a federal judge in Washington, D.C. ordering the Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials to end a policy of open-ended detention for asylum seekers; a federal judge advances litigation over the citizenship question that the U.S. government is adding to the 2020 census; a series of wildfires break out across Northern California, prompting evacuations and an influx of firefighters in advance of the Independence Day holiday; Los Angeles will kick off the process for licensing marijuana cultivators and manufacturers on Aug. 1; the Wisconsin Supreme Court rules a police officer did not need a warrant to draw the blood of a drunken driver who fell unconscious; Chinese scientists reveal new solar technology could turn windows into tiny electrical generators; Germany’s ruling coalition has averted a crisis – for now at least – after Chancellor Angela Merkel agreed to tighten her country’s southern border against asylum seekers, and more.

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National

Immigrants awaiting deportation hearings line up outside the building that houses the immigration courts in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Amy Taxin, File)

1.) A federal judge in Washington, D.C. on Monday ordered the Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials to end a policy of open-ended detention for asylum seekers as their cases make their way through the U.S. legal system.

Immigration advocates gather in Foley Square on July 3, 2018, to celebrate what New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood called a “major win” in a constitutional challenge to the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. (Adam Klasfeld, Courthouse News Service)

2.) Advancing litigation over the citizenship question that the U.S. government is adding to the 2020 census, a federal judge on Tuesday highlighted evidence of bad faith by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.

Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Associated Press)

3.) The Republican chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee introduced a draft bill this week that has conservationists worried: a revamp of the Endangered Species Act critics say will essentially gut the law.

Sen. Richard M. Burr, Republican chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, arrives at a hearing followed by Sen. Mark R. Warner, the panel’s top Democrat. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

4.) The Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday backed the intelligence community’s assessment that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election to sow discord and aid President Donald Trump.

Regional

A firefighter scrambles to stop a wildfire as wind drives embers across Highway 20 near Clearlake Oaks, Calif., on Sunday, July 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

5.) A series of wildfires broke out across Northern California over the weekend, prompting evacuations and an influx of firefighters in advance of the Independence Day holiday.

This Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017 photo shows one of an assortment of marijuana strains during the High Times Harvest Cup in San Bernardino, Calif. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel,)

6.) Los Angeles will kick off the process for licensing marijuana cultivators and manufacturers on Aug. 1, but it’s likely to be many months before any of those companies open their doors for business.

UC Irvine

7.) A police officer did not need a warrant to draw the blood of a drunken driver who fell unconscious, the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

Science

A crab-eating macaque and her juvenile at Djuanda Forest Park, West Java, Indonesia. (Image via Wikipedia)

8.) Suggesting that human carriers of the Zika virus experience pregnancy loss more commonly than previously thought, researchers reported new findings Tuesday involving monkeys.

(Sun et al/South China University/Joule)

9.) New solar technology could turn windows into tiny electrical generators, allowing people to heat and cool their homes in a more environmentally friendly way, Chinese scientists revealed Tuesday.

Research & Polls

10.) Now more than ever the internet is ingrained into our daily lives, and a nonscientific report Tuesday from the Pew Research Center says the positives can outweigh the negatives of being constantly connected despite misinformation, privacy issues and losing out on face-to-face interactions.

International

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, right, and Interior Minister Horst Seehofer, left, attend a special faction meeting of the Christian Union parties ahead, of a debate at the German parliament Bundestag at the Reichstag building in Berlin, Tuesday, July 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

11.) Germany’s ruling coalition has averted a crisis – for now at least – after Chancellor Angela Merkel agreed to tighten her country’s southern border against asylum seekers, according to news reports.

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