Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump pardoning conservative commentator Dinesh D’Souza who pleaded guilty to campaign finance fraud; the largest federal employee union claiming in court that President Trump is unlawfully restricting the amount of time government workers can devote to union activity; a federal judge upholds a U.S. government ban on the use of Kaspersky Lab cybersecurity products in government networks; in the third installment of a four-part series on the effort to overturn a 150-year old law in Florida that strips felons of their voting rights for life, a proposal to dramatically change the law goes before voters in November; the Ninth Circuit panel rules a relative of an Egyptian composer lacked legal standing to bring a copyright infringement claim against rapper and business mogul Jay-Z; the European General Court rules EU parliament officials were wrong to fine a far-right member for saying within the span of a year that migrants were “human garbage” and that that men are intellectually superior to women, and more.

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National

Conservative scholar and filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza, left, accompanied by his lawyer Benjamin Brafman leaves federal court, in New York. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

1.) President Donald Trump on Thursday pardoned conservative commentator Dinesh D’Souza who pleaded guilty to campaign finance fraud.

Members of the American Federal of Government Employees decry union busting at a rally. (Photo courtesy AFGE website)

2.) The largest federal employee union claims in court that President Donald Trump is unlawfully restricting the amount of time government workers can devote to union activity.

The headquarters of Kaspersky Lab in Moscow. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, File)

3.) A federal judge has upheld a U.S. government ban on the use of Kaspersky Lab cybersecurity products in government networks,  dismissing two lawsuits the Moscow-based antivirus company brought challenging the constitutionality of the ban.

(Image via Secret Service Twitter page.)

4.) The Secret Service overpaid by $3.9 million for seats on the charter flights of four presidential candidates during the 2016 campaign, according to a report a government watchdog released Thursday.

Regional

Virginia Atkins listens to Florida Gov. Rick Scott at state capitol building in Tallahassee during the hearing to get her voting rights back. (Photo courtesy WFSU-TV/The FLORIDA Channel)

5.) In the third installment of a four-part series on the effort to overturn a 150-year old law in Florida that strips felons of their voting rights for life, a proposal to dramatically change the law goes before voters in November.

Roberts Residence Hall, Iowa State University.(Photo by Manop via Wikipedia Commons)

6.) A Latino civil rights organization and an Iowa State University student filed a lawsuit calling the state’s new voter ID law unconstitutional and particularly burdensome for minority, disabled and elderly voters.

(Via Wikipedia)

7.) A Ninth Circuit panel ruled Thursday the relative of an Egyptian composer lacked legal standing to bring a copyright infringement claim against rapper and business mogul Jay-Z, affirming a federal judge’s ruling that composers’ “moral rights” protecting their works are not transferable to their heirs.

The gaming room inside the new Four Winds Casino Resort in South Bend, Ind. (Robert Franklin/South Bend Tribune via AP)

8.) After losing an initial challenge in February to the Interior Department’s decision to set aside land for a tribal casino, a nonprofit scored a rare court victory that will allow it to assess whether the government wrongly withheld documents from the court record.

Science

This image taken during the New Horizons mission shows the mountain range on the edge of the Sputnik Planitia ice plain, with dune formations clearly visible in the bottom half of the picture. (NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute)

9.) New images of Pluto’s surface reveal dunes that scientists say are likely to have been formed of methane ice grains released into its low-pressure atmosphere.

Research & Polls

10.) More teens say they use social media like YouTube, Snapchat and Instagram “almost constantly,” according to a new Pew Research Center survey released Thursday.

International

The hemicycle in Brussels. (Photo by Paasikivi via Wikipedia Commons)

11.) Parliament officials were wrong to fine a far-right member, the European General Court ruled Thursday, for saying within the span of a year that migrants were “human garbage” and that that men are intellectually superior to women.

Romanian military staff stand at the end of a corridor on the Mihail Kogalniceanu airbase, near the Black Sea port of Constanta, Romania, a Soviet-era facility which became a key focus of a European investigation into allegations that the CIA operated secret prisons. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)

12.) Romania and Lithuania must pay more than $100,000 to two men who were tortured at CIA black sites that the countries hosted, the European Court of Human Rights ruled Thursday.

13.) A Catholic hospital in Germany failed to persuade an EU magistrate Thursday that it was justified in firing a doctor because of his divorce.

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