Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the U.S. Senate ending a weekend-long government shut down with a procedural vote of 81-18 to restart federal operations; the Pennsylvania Supreme Court striking down the boundaries of the state’s 18 congressional districts, saying they “clearly, plainly and palpably” violate the state constitution; filing suit over the $666.5 million American lobster fishery, a group of environmentalists say netting entanglements will cause the extinction of the North Atlantic right whale in the next 22 years; a new study finds developed nations can contain health care costs while maintaining a healthy population spending more of their health care budgets on social services, and more.

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National

The dome of the Capitol Building is visible at left of a closure sign that is posted outside of the Library of Congress during a government shutdown in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

1.) Reopening the government for at least the next three weeks, the Senate killed the shutdown Monday with the promise of an upcoming vote on key immigration issues.

An aerial view of the Indian River Lagoon in Florida. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

2.) The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday that any legal challenge of what waters are subject to federal protection must be brought in a trial court, not a federal appeals court.

The chambers of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.(Photo by Ruhrfisch via Wikipedia Commons)

3.) The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Monday struck down the boundaries of the state’s 18 congressional districts, saying they “clearly, plainly and palpably” violate the state constitution.

4.) The Supreme Court took up a land battle Monday where 1,544 acres of privately owned Louisiana timberland were designated as critical habitat for the dusky gopher frog.

Regional

In this April 10, 2008 file photo, a North Atlantic right whale breaks the ocean surface off Provincetown, Mass., in Cape Cod Bay. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)

5.) Filing suit over the American lobster fishery — a $666.5 million operation that spans Maine to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina — a group of environmentalists say netting entanglements will cause the extinction of the North Atlantic right whale in the next 22 years.

Senator Carlos Uresti. (Photo via Facebook)

6.) Jury trial begins Monday for Texas state Senator Carlos Uresti, who faces 11 felony counts, including fraud and money laundering, that could send him to federal prison for 200 years.

7.) Vegetarians cannot sue Buffalo Wild Wings for failing to disclose that its french fries, mozzarella sticks and other fried non-meat items are cooked in beef tallow, a federal judge ruled.

Research & Polls

View of Toronto’s Financial District from the CN Tower in 2008. (Photo by Agunther via Wikipedia Commons)

8.)  Developed nations can contain health care costs while maintaining a healthy population spending more of their health care budgets on social services, according to a new study.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., leaves the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018, after Senate leaders reached an agreement to advance a bill ending government shutdown. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

9.)  Lawmakers in Washington spent the weekend negotiating a deal to end the shutdown of the federal government while blaming their colleagues on the other side of the aisle for it. Meanwhile, more Americans say they blame Republicans for the shutdown, according to a new poll.

International

Migrants sit on the ground next to Spanish police officers after storming a fence to enter the Spanish enclave of Ceuta, Spain. (AP Photo/Jesus Moron, File)

10.)  At least one international human smuggling network is operated by “independent players,” according to a new study that examines the illegal transportation of people from the Horn of Africa into Northern Europe.

 

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