Woman Calls QB Camp Boss a Horn Dog

     LOS ANGELES (CN) – The owner of the “Dreammaker” training camp for high school quarterbacks subjected an employee to “a near constant stream of sexual overtures; quid pro quo demands for sexual favors; persistent, repeated, and sexually explicit text messages and/or emails; and nude or semi-nude photographs of himself, including a self-shot photograph of his erect penis; and a written threat of sexual violence,” the woman claims in Superior Court.
     Rebecca Sheldon seeks punitive damages from Steve Clarkson Jr., The Steve Clarkson Dreammaker Foundation, and QB Weekly.
     Clarkson says QB Weekly is a front. She claims that “after Dreammaker was informed of the present lawsuit, it sold, transferred and/or secreted all of its assets, employee coaches, corporate books and records and most other pertinent evidence supporting this lawsuit to the newly formed company called QB Weekly with the intent of ensuring that plaintiff would not be able to enforce her anticipated judgment in this action against the newly formed entity.”
     Defendant Clarkson is or was the president of both companies, she says.
     Clarkson’s company “advertises on its website that its clients include such notable persons as Joe Montana and celebrities such as Calvin Cordozar Broadus Jr. (a.k.a. ‘Snoop Dogg’), both of whom have sent their sons to quarterback training camps with Steve Clarkson Sr. It also boasts of having coached one David Sills V, a seventh grader who gained nationwide notoriety this past year by verbally committing to recruiters for USC to play football for the school beginning in the year 2015,” according to the complaint.
     Sheldon says Steve Clarkson Jr. interviewed her in October 2009 and “explained that a production position would be available to plaintiff where she would be responsible for research stories for the production of the Steve Clarkson Dreammaker reality show and she would host the show, interviewing young football athletes about their lives and football ambitions.” She says she was hired as the foundation’s publicity director.
     Sheldon says she thought it was a “dream job,” but shortly after she started working directly under Clarkson, he subjected her to the “quid pro quo demands for sexual favors,” and the “near constant stream of sexual overtures,” including the explicit photos and “written threat of sexual violence.”
     She adds: “When plaintiff objected to Clarkson’s behavior toward her, he subjected her to acts of retaliation, including but not limited to demotion to menial tasks for a period of time.”
     She says the “employment atmosphere had become so intolerable that she was forced to resign,” after less than a year on the job.
     Sheldon seeks compensatory and punitive damages for sexual harassment, hostile work environment, discrimination, retaliation, wrongful discharge, negligent infliction of emotional distress and fraudulent transfer.
     She is represented by Paul Cullen of the Cullen Law Firm.

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