Weeks After 2030 HIV Pledge, Report Shows US Headway Stalled

By MIKE STOBBE, AP Medical Writer

Reggie Batiste, program manager with AIDS Healthcare Foundation, administers a free HIV test as part of National HIV Testing Day in Atlanta on June 27, 2013. Just three weeks after President Donald Trump launched a campaign to end the U.S. HIV epidemic by 2030, new data suggests research has already stalled. Health officials said on Feb. 27, 2019, that after declining for several years, the estimated number of new HIV infections held about steady from 2013 to 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Three weeks ago, President Donald Trump announced a campaign to end the U.S. HIV epidemic by 2030. But new data show that progress against the disease stalled in recent years.

After declining for several years, the estimated number of new HIV infections held about steady from 2013 to 2016. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the statistics Wednesday, saying it was the latest available data.

Health officials already know HIV diagnoses had stopped declining. But that is a flawed measure, because in some cases people are not diagnosed until years after infection.

This latest CDC report estimates how many new infections happen each year, whether they’re diagnosed or not. And it too shows a stall.

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