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Saturday, March 2, 2024 | Back issues
Courthouse News Service Courthouse News Service

Water Main Break Closes Honolulu Court

HONOLULU (CN) - Oahu's First Circuit court building remained closed Monday afternoon after a contractor working in the area struck an eight-inch water main.

In consideration of the closing, Hawaii Supreme Court Chief Justice Mark Recktenwald issued an order "extending time to file items due to be filed or conduct hearings required by one business day to Tuesday, March 1, 2016," and ordered canceled hearings and trials to be rescheduled for the next available date.

Police tape blocked entrances to Ka'ahumanu Hale as court employees trickled out of the building and people with court business peered at the judge's order taped to the building's closed doors.

The water main break, which was reported to the Board of Water Supply at 12:20 p.m., affected four businesses in the area and the Circuit Court complex. The two right lanes of South Street were closed in the area of 550 South Street to allow for repair, which was expected to be completed overnight.

The Board of Water Supply was unable to immediately confirm whether the break was connected to the construction of Keauhou Place, a 40-story residential tower currently in the excavation stage behind the court.

Part of the ambitious nine-block "Our Kaka'ako" project by landowner Kamehameha Schools, the Keauhou Place tower, townhouses and shops will be served by the Civic Center rail station along a redesigned Halekauwila street, which bounds the "mauka" or mountain side of the courthouse.

Water main repairs were expected to last into the early morning hours. A water wagon was available at 556 Reed Lane for those affected.

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