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Sunday, June 23, 2024 | Back issues
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US Saw Only Seven Major Work Stoppages in 2017

There were only seven major work stoppages in the United States in 2017, the second lowest since the government started keeping track of the number in 1947, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics said Friday.

(CN) - There were only seven major work stoppages in the United States in 2017, the second lowest since the government started keeping track of the number in 1947, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics said Friday.

The bureau defines a major work stoppage as any walkout that involves 1,00 or more workers and lasts at least one shift.

The lowest annual total of major work stoppages was five in 2009.

According to the government, major work stoppages beginning in 2017 idled 25,000 workers; in 2009, by comparison, the number idled was 13,000.

In 2017 the information industry had the most workers idled by a major work stoppage with 15,000 workers, which accounted for over half of all workers idled. Public administration accounted for the second largest number of workers idled by major work stoppages with over 5,000 workers, or a fifth of all workers

idled.

The largest major work stoppage of the year, by days idle, occurred between Charter Communications and

the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers union with 345,600 total days idle and involving

1,800 workers.

This work stoppage was one of two major work stoppages within the information industry, the second was between AT&T and the Communication Workers of America involving 13,200 workers and lasting one day.

A work stoppage between the Chicago New Car Dealer Committee and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers union involved 1,700 workers for a total of 56,100 days idle.

Categories / Economy, Employment, Government, National

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