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Top eight today

Top eight stories for today including the U.S. economy bounced back with 531,000 new jobs; A 15-year-long legal case between Russia and former shareholders of oil giant Yukos will drag on even longer; Texas filed a second lawsuit against the Biden administration over vaccine mandates, and more.

National

US economy picks up steam, adding 531,000 jobs

American employers added 531,000 jobs last month, signaling an accelerated recovery after a slowdown caused by the delta variant of the coronavirus.    

A hiring sign is displayed in Downers Grove, Ill., on June 24, 2021. (Nam Y. Huh/AP)

Covid-fighting pill is coming as US preorders millions of doses from Pfizer

An experimental pill developed by Pfizer could save the lives of those battling the harshest bouts with Covid-19.

A volunteer waits for patients at the door of a Covid-19 vaccination clinic set up on Sept. 24, 2021, at Bethel AME Church in Providence, R.I., as part of an effort to make testing and vaccines more available to an underserved community. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Texas sues Biden administration over vaccine mandate for businesses

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has sued the Biden administration over vaccine mandates yet again – this time to challenge the validity of a requirement that private companies with 100 or more employees get inoculated against Covid-19.

President Joe Biden speaks about Covid-19 vaccinations after touring a construction site for a Microsoft data center in Elk Grove Village, Ill., in October 2021. (Susan Walsh/AP)

Series of blockbuster economic reports nudges Wall Street ever forward

What began as a slow start to the week picked up considerably for investors when a slew of positive economic reports and a dovish Federal Reserve announcement goosed Wall Street.

A sign for Wall Street hangs in front of the New York Stock Exchange on July 8, 2021. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, file)

Chief judge slams comparison between Capitol riot and George Floyd protests

The chief federal judge in Washington was quick to offer course correction Friday to a Capitol rioter who has argued that people who protested the murder of George Floyd in summer 2020 were shown more leniency than has been offered to those who joined the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Supporters of then-President Donald Trump try to break through a police barrier at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 6, 2021. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Regional

Pasadena sues Caltech over groundwater contamination

The city of Pasadena, California, filed a lawsuit against the California Institute of Technology on Thursday over groundwater contamination caused by rocket research done by the Jet Propulsion Lab, which is owned by NASA but operated by Caltech. 

The JPL campus in Pasadena, California. (Wikimedia image)

San Francisco to pay $2.5 million in police killing of unarmed fleeing man

The city of San Francisco will pay $2.5 million to settle a lawsuit over a rookie police officer who shot an unarmed Black man fleeing from a stolen van in 2017, even as the former officer faces manslaughter charges in criminal court.

FILE -This file photo shows a patch and badge on the uniform of a San Francisco police officer in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

International

Dutch high court sets aside $50B award for Russian oil shareholders

A 15-year-long legal case between Moscow and the former shareholders of oil giant Yukos will drag on even longer, after being sent back to a lower court Friday. 

A police officer patrols near the headquarters of the bankrupt oil giant Yukos in Moscow in 2007. (Sergey Ponomarev/AP)

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