Top Eight

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top eight CNS stories for today including Senate Republicans want to put a stop to nationwide injunctions that have placed blocks on Trump administration policies; An audit found the California Lottery flouted education funding laws and owes public schools $36 million; The European Court of Human Rights found that owning stock in a collapsing Icelandic bank may have affected the impartiality of judges in a trial of one of the bank’s top executives, and more.

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National

1.) Senate Republicans want to put a stop to nationwide injunctions, aiming to stifle the power of courts that have placed blocks on Trump administration policies from coast to coast.

(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

2.) Escalating his intervention in the court system, President Donald Trump took aim Tuesday morning at Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, saying they should recuse themselves from cases relating to the president.

(AP Photo/J. David Ake)

3.) A Mexican family cannot sue the U.S. border patrol agent who shot across the border and killed their 15-year-old son in Mexico, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Regional

4.) With an outdated prize payout scheme and lack of oversight, the California Lottery flouted education funding laws and owes public schools $36 million, according to an audit released Tuesday.

5.) Purple state voters like those in Colorado don’t always offer a good measurement for predicting the results of the 2020 Democratic primary, but they are always ready to discuss the nitty-gritty nuances.

(CNS Photo/Amanda Pampuro)

6.) Hoping to turn funerals green, a California lawmaker is pushing legislation that would allow families to compost their loved ones and turn their remains into soil.

International

7.) Owning stock in a collapsing Icelandic bank may have affected the impartiality of judges in a trial of one of the bank’s top executives, the European Court of Human Rights found Tuesday.

8.) After more than three months of resistance over its money-laundering indictment, Turkey’s state-run Halkbank agreed Tuesday to be arraigned in the United States.

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