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Top Eight

Top eight stories for today including an association of elected Florida officials tasked with overseeing state courts earn millions for health care for court clerks during retirement when residents access the court system; The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office released a report that says the cost of raising the minimum wage to $15-an-hour is too high; The World Health Organization said drugmakers may need to adjust their vaccines to fight new strains of the coronavirus, and more.

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top eight stories for today including an association of elected Florida officials tasked with overseeing state courts earn millions for health care for court clerks during retirement when residents access the court system; The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office released a report that says the cost of raising the minimum wage to $15-an-hour is too high; The World Health Organization said drugmakers may need to adjust their vaccines to fight new strains of the coronavirus, and more.

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National

1.) The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office released a report Monday that says the cost of raising the minimum wage to $15-an-hour is too high: poised to create unemployment for 1.4 million Americans while lifting 900,000 people out of poverty. 

FILE - In this April 15, 2015, file photo, protesters march in support of raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour as part of an expanding national movement known as Fight for 15, in Miami. A national coalition of labor unions, along with racial and social justice organizations, will stage a mass walkout from work July 20, 2020, as part of an ongoing reckoning on systemic racism and police brutality in the U.S. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

2.) Heading into this week’s impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, a picture has begun to emerge of speedy but ultimately anticlimactic proceedings in the Senate.

FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo, Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier at the Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

3.) One of the highest-ranking members of the Proud Boys to be arrested in connection with the Capitol riot on Jan. 6 was ordered released Monday by a federal judge despite prosecutors’ pleas to detain him as a flight risk. 

A protester carries a banner of a far-right group, Proud Boys, that has brawled with Black Lives Matter protesters while other members start to unfurl a large U.S. flag in front of the Oregon State Capitol in Salem on Monday, Sept. 7, 2020. The protester at center is holding a paintball gun. Hundreds of people gathered on Labor Day in a small town south of Portland for a pro-President Donald Trump vehicle rally, just over a week after member of a far-right group was fatally shot after a Trump caravan went through Oregon’s largest city. Later, pro-Trump supporters and counter-protesters clashed at Oregon’s Capitol. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)

4.) A Florida businessman linked to Rudy Giuliani was sentenced on Monday to a year and a day in prison for his involvement in $2 million investor fraud scheme and lying to the government. 

David Correia, who was indicted along with other associates of Rudy Giuliani, leaves Federal Court after his appearance on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen).

Regional

5.) When Floridians access the state’s court system, an association of elected officials tasked with overseeing the courts earn millions for health care for state court clerks during retirement.

6.) Republican Texas Congressman Ron Wright died Sunday after being treated for Covid-19, becoming the first sitting member Congress to die after a coronavirus diagnosis.

FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2018 file photo, U.S. Rep. Ron Wright, R-Texas, walks to a session during member-elect briefings and orientation on Capitol Hill in Washington. Wright, the Texas Republican who had battled health challenges over the past year including lung cancer treatment died Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021, more than two weeks after contracting COVID-19, his office said Monday, Feb. 8. He was 67. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

7.) After a career spanning more than four decades in Washington, Senator Richard Shelby of Alabama announced Monday he will not seek reelection in 2022.  

FILE -In this Sept. 24, 2020 file photo, Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., speaks during the Senate's Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Shelby, the Senate's fourth most senior member, has told confidantes that he does not intend to run for reelection next year _ prompting some Republicans to urge the powerful, establishment politician to reconsider, even as potential replacements prepare to run for his seat. (Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via AP, Pool, File)

International

8.) The World Health Organization on Monday said mutations of the novel coronavirus are cause for concern and that drugmakers may need to adjust their vaccines to fight new strains of the deadly virus.

FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2020 file photo, Thabisle khlatshwayo, who received her first shot for a COVID-19 vaccine trial, receives her second AstraZeneca shot at a vaccine trial facility set at Soweto's Chris Sani Baragwanath Hospital outside Johannesburg, South Africa. South Africa suspended on Sunday Feb. 7, 2021 plans to inoculate its front-line health care workers with the AstraZeneca vaccine after a small clinical trial suggested that it isn't effective in preventing mild to moderate illness from the variant dominant in the country. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)
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