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Top Eight

Top eight stories for today including Georgia voters finally went to the polls to decide control of the Senate; The EPA finalized a transparency rule that will exclude the anonymized data long instrumental in curbing pollution; The World Health Organization said the bumpy rollout of vaccines around the world against the novel coronavirus was to be expected, and more.

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top eight stories for today including Georgia voters finally went to the polls to decide control of the Senate; The EPA finalized a transparency rule that will exclude the anonymized data long instrumental in curbing pollution; The World Health Organization said the bumpy rollout of vaccines against the novel coronavirus was to be expected, and more.

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National

1.) Georgia voters finally went to the polls Tuesday to choose whether Republicans David Perdue and Kelly Leoffler or Democrats Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock will represent them in the U.S. Senate in a runoff contest, an encore to the rancorous 2020 elections.

Voters mark their ballots at the Lawrenceville Road United Methodist Church in Tucker, Ga. during a Senate runoff election on Jan. 5, 2021. (/Ben Gray/AP)

2.) Tying a bow on four years of deregulation, Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency finalized a transparency rule Tuesday that will exclude the anonymized data long instrumental in curbing pollution.

Pollution spiked in the 19th century as the Industrial Revolution took hold.

3.) Standing up for vulnerable Americans whom the Covid-19 pandemic has brought to the brink, seven attorneys general joined New York’s top prosecutor Tuesday in a court challenge of interest rates that President Trump has allowed to go sky high, a boon for predatory payday lenders.

FILE- In this Aug. 9, 2018, photo a manager of a financial services store in Ballwin, Mo., counts cash being paid to a client as part of a loan. The nation's federal financial watchdog has announced its plans to roll back most of its consumer protections governing the payday lending industry. It's the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's first rollback of regulations under its new Director, Kathy Kraninger, who took over the bureau late last year. (AP Photo/Sid Hastings, File)

4.) The First Circuit struggled Tuesday with a policy that lets border agents look through the phones or laptops of travelers returning from abroad.

A traveler with Global Entry or TSA PreCheck goes through security at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York on Sept. 26, 2020. (Courthouse News photo/Barbara Leonard)

5.) Balking at methodology that put the population of the Shawnee Tribe at zero when it has thousands of members, the D.C. Circuit ordered an injunction Tuesday on how the government administers coronavirus-relief funds to Native Americans.

Participants ride in the morning parade at Crow Fair in Crow Agency, south of Billings, Mont., on Aug. 18, 2019. The Crow Tribe in Montana ordered its members to lock down for two weeks as tribal leaders moved to slow a sharp spike in coronavirus cases. (Mike Clark/The Billings Gazette via AP)

Regional

6.) A Wisconsin prosecutor announced Tuesday that none of the officers involved in the police shooting of a Black man in Kenosha last August will face criminal charges, prompting the community to brace for another round of protests.

Supporters for Jacob Blake march Monday, Jan. 4, 2021, in Kenosha, Wis. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)

7.) The Eighth Circuit on Tuesday blocked Arkansas’ persistent efforts to usher in some of the nation’s most restrictive abortion measures, striking down a pair of laws barring the procedure after 18 weeks of pregnancy and on the basis of a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome.

FILE - In this March 14, 2019 file photograph, a Planned Parenthood supporter hosts an abortion rights button on her hat during a rally on the steps of the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. On Tuesday, March 19, 2019, Mississippi senators passed the final version of a bill that would ban most abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected, about six weeks into pregnancy. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

International

8.) The World Health Organization on Tuesday said the bumpy rollout of vaccines around the world against the novel coronavirus was to be expected for an endeavor so complex and unprecedented.

A man wearing a British union flag face mask walks past a coronavirus advice sign outside a bank in Glasgow the morning after stricter lockdown measures came into force for Scotland, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2021. Further measures were put in place Tuesday as part of lockdown restrictions in a bid to halt the spread of the coronavirus.(Andrew Milligan/PA via AP)
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