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Top Eight

Top eight stories for today including the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to look at an injunction that lets college athletes make money; A group of 10 states led by Texas filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google over its grip on the online ad market; United Nations experts said pandemic-recovery efforts give the globe an opportunity to make construction more energy efficient, and more.

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top eight stories for today including the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to look at an injunction that lets college athletes make money; A group of 10 states led by Texas filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google over its grip on the online ad market; United Nations experts said pandemic-recovery efforts give the globe an opportunity to make construction more energy efficient, and more.

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National

1.) Four years after it declined to hear a watershed case on compensating college athletes, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed Wednesday to look at an injunction that lets players rake in unlimited funds, so long as they relate to their studies.

The Big Ten logo is seen on the field before an NCAA college football game between Iowa and Miami of Ohio, Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019, in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

2.) A group of 10 states led by Texas filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google on Wednesday, claiming the tech giant struck an unlawful agreement with Facebook to manipulate advertising auctions.

Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

3.) Federal regulators are withdrawing a nuclear waste proposal that had prompted an unusually widespread chorus of opposition, including from those who worried the plan could have led to radioactive waste being shipped to local landfills across the U.S.

FILE - This Dec. 16, 2009, file photo, shows the Indian Point nuclear power plant in Buchanan, N.Y., as seen from across the Hudson River in Tomkins Cove, N.Y. U.S. nuclear plants will be allowed to keep workers on longer shifts to deal with staffing problems in the coronavirus pandemic. Nuclear Regulatory Commission officials outlined the temporary shift extensions to nuclear power officials on Thursday, April 2, 2020. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

Regional

4.) Florida officials voted Wednesday to shut down oyster harvesting in Apalachicola Bay, a major source of the nation’s supply, due to a diminished population caused by low freshwater flows.

FILE - In this May 25, 2016, file photo, the work day begins early for oyster harvesters in the Florida panhandle's Apalachicola Bay. Because of a dwindling oyster population, a Florida agency is expected to shut down oyster harvesting in Apalachicola Bay through the end of 2025, dealing a blow to an area that historically produced 90% of the state’s oysters and 10% of the nation’s. (Taimy Alvarez/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)

5.) Robinhood Financial, the high-flying stock-trading app that’s hugely popular among millennials, was hit with a consumer-protection suit Wednesday by the state of Massachusetts.

(Image courtesy of Robinhood Financial via Courthouse News)

International

6.) Coming off a year where greenhouse gas emissions from buildings hit record highs, energy experts from the United Nations reported Wednesday that pandemic-recovery efforts give the globe an opportunity to make construction more efficient as global city populations boom. 

Building CO2 emissions need to be cut in half to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, according to the International Energy Agency. (UNEP graph via Courthouse News)

7.) A Cypriot lawyer with ties to the Trump administration came up short in his final appeal before the EU’s high court Wednesday in a dispute over money lost during the last financial crisis

Cliffs on the coast of Cape Greco in Cyprus. (Photo via Dimitris Vetsikas/ Pixabay)

8.) Siding with two Dutch speed skaters, an EU court ruled Wednesday that the International Skating Union has been illegally forcing skaters to compete only in events it sanctions.

Image by angelinawongm15 from Pixabay

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