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Top Eight

Top eight CNS stories for today including TikTok is banking on D.C. Circuit intervention in its feud with the Trump administration; The European Court of Justice ruled EU law protects consumers from having to opt out of data-sharing agreements in a contract; The First Circuit found Harvard University’s use of race in admissions doesn’t illegally discriminate against Asian-Americans, and more.

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top eight CNS stories for today including TikTok is banking on D.C. Circuit intervention in its feud with the Trump administration; The European Court of Justice ruled EU law protects consumers from having to opt out of data-sharing agreements in a contract; The First Circuit found Harvard University’s use of race in admissions doesn’t illegally discriminate against Asian-Americans, and more.

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National

1.) Flouting the Trump administration’s Thursday deadline for it to see its U.S. operations sold off, TikTok is banking on D.C. Circuit intervention in a feud made murky by the outcome of the 2020 election.

Icons for the smartphone apps TikTok and WeChat are seen on a smartphone screen in Beijing, Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. President Donald Trump has ordered a sweeping but unspecified ban on dealings with the Chinese owners of the consumer apps TikTok and WeChat, although it remains unclear if he has the legal authority to actually ban the apps from the U.S. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

2.) Harvard University’s use of race in admissions doesn’t illegally discriminate against Asian-Americans, the First Circuit held Thursday. 

Students walk near the Widener Library in Harvard Yard at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., in 2019. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

3.) California Governor Gavin Newsom will appoint Vice President-elect Kamala Harris’ successor to the U.S. Senate. Who he will select among the very large tent of California Democrats is anyone’s guess.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., listens during a gun safety forum Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Regional

4.) The Seventh Circuit heard arguments Thursday over whether an Indiana county’s Christmas nativity scene on courthouse grounds violates the Constitution’s ban on state-sanctioned religion.   

A Christmas nativity scene. (Photo via Vincent Ciro/Pixabay)

5.) A unanimous Kentucky Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the use of executive orders by Democratic Governor Andy Beshear to slow the spread of Covid-19 does not violate the state constitution.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear walks through the state's Emergency Operations Center at the Boone National Guard Center in Frankfort, Ky., on his way to a news conference on May 3, 2020. (Ryan C. Hermens/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP)

International

6.) EU law protects consumers from having to opt out of data-sharing agreements in a contract, the European Court of Justice ruled. 

A map of where the telecom Orange is active in the globe. (Wikipedia image via Courthouse News)

7.) Even if the nations of the world stopped all greenhouse gas emissions today, Earth will continue to warm, glaciers and ice caps will continue to melt and oceans will continue to rise for centuries, according to a dire study published Thursday.

In this Aug. 15, 2019, photo, a large Iceberg floats away as the sun sets near Kulusuk, Greenland. Greenland is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. Scientists are hard at work there, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. For Greenland is where the planet's future is being written. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

8.) Countries cannot automatically refuse extradition requests to Poland based on the worsening condition of the country’s judicial system, an adviser to the EU’s top court said Thursday. 

On Oct. 8, 2018, government opponents with signs reading "Constitution" protest an overhaul of the justice system and the forced early retirement of Supreme Court judges aged 65 and above, before the court's building in Warsaw, Poland. The European Union's top court ordered Poland on Oct. 19, 2018, to immediately suspend the politically charged legal change. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
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