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Top Eight

Top eight CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign objected to the topics for this week’s final presidential debate; The Justice Department unsealed an indictment accusing six Russian military officers of orchestrating a string of cyberattacks; The Supreme Court will rule on the Trump administration’s policy of forcing asylum seekers to wait in Mexico, and more.

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top eight CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign objected to the topics for this week’s final presidential debate; The Justice Department unsealed an indictment accusing six Russian military officers of orchestrating a string of cyberattacks; The Supreme Court will rule on the Trump administration’s policy of forcing asylum seekers to wait in Mexico, and more.

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National

1.) In a letter accusing the nonpartisan Commission on Presidential Debates of political bias, President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign said the final debate this week should be focused on foreign policy.  

President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at Prescott Regional Airport, Monday, Oct. 19, 2020, in Prescott, Ariz. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

2.) A gun control advocacy group co-founded by billionaire former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg said Monday it is launching a $4.5 million ad campaign in pivotal battleground states blasting Republicans on gun safety and their handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Democratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg speaks during an appearance at his field office in Orlando on Tuesday, March 3, 2020. (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

3.) The Justice Department unsealed an indictment Monday accusing six Russian military officers of orchestrating a string of cyberattacks targeting U.S. businesses, French elections and the 2018 Winter Olympics.

A poster showing six wanted Russian military intelligence officers is displayed before a news conference at the Department of Justice, Monday, Oct. 19, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, pool)

4.) The Supreme Court said Monday it will rule on the Trump administration’s policy of forcing asylum seekers, regardless of where they fled from, to wait in Mexico while U.S. courts process their claims.

In this Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, photo, migrants live in a refugee camp in Matamoros, Mexico. One by one, asylum-seekers from El Salvador and Honduras who are waiting in Mexico for court hearings in the United States appeared before an immigration judge to explain why, after months of effort, they couldn't find an attorney. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

5.) Experts called it critical Monday that a federal judge has blocked the Trump administration from leaving nearly 700,000 people without food stamps at a time of rising food insecurity with millions of Americans out of work during the coronavirus pandemic.

FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2020, file photo, clients line up outside the Mississippi Department of Employment Security WIN Job Center in Pearl, Miss. A critical snapshot of the job market and the economy to be released Friday, Oct. 2, is expected to show a further deceleration in hiring as the nation’s viral caseload creeps higher just as financial aid from the government has faded. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

Regional

6.) Texas has launched what is likely the nation’s largest state-level effort to estimate how many people have already been infected with Covid-19 and could be immune to the disease as a result.

Visitors, some wearing masks to protect against the spread of COVID-19, walk along the River Walk in San Antonio, Wednesday, June 24, 2020, in San Antonio. Cases of COVID-19 have spiked in Texas and the governor of Texas is encouraging people to wear masks in public and stay home if possible. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

7.) A northern Wisconsin judge left the state’s mandate limiting public gatherings and capping bar and restaurant capacity in place Monday, ruling against conservatives fighting to end such restrictions and handing the Democratic governor his second virus-related court win in a week.

FILE - In this May 13, 2020 file photo, The Dairyland Brew Pub opens to patrons in Appleton, Wis. A Wisconsin judge on Monday, Oct. 19, 2020 reimposed an order from Gov. Tony Evers’ administration limiting the number of people who can gather in bars, restaurants and other indoor venues to 25% of capacity. (William Glasheen/The Post-Crescent via AP File)

8.) When the first wave of Covid-19 vaccines roll out in California, they will be reserved for first responders and people in high-risk categories — meaning the general public will likely have to wait until 2021 before they can get one, Governor Gavin Newsom said Monday.

FILE - In this June 26, 2020 file photo, Gov. Gavin Newsom holds a face mask as he urges people to wear them to fight the spread of the coronavirus during a news conference in Rancho Cordova, Calif. A member of California Gov. Gavin Newsom's office staff tested positive for COVID-19 this week and contact tracing has begun, the office said in a statement Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. The staff member had not interacted with Newsom or with staff that routinely interacts with the governor, the statement said. Separately, a state employee who works in a space shared with some staff from the governor's office also tested positive for COVID-19 but the person also had not interacted with the governor or his close staff, the office said. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, Pool, File)

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