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Top Eight

Top eight CNS stories for today including the U.S. Supreme Court granted the Trump administration’s request to halt the 2020 census count; White Christians still back President Trump in large numbers but that support has slipped in recent weeks; California officials argued before the Ninth Circuit that a highway construction project running through an old-growth grove of magnificent redwood trees would not harm the forest, and more.

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top eight CNS stories for today including the U.S. Supreme Court granted the Trump administration’s request to halt the 2020 census count; White Christians still back President Trump in large numbers but that support has slipped in recent weeks; California officials argued before the Ninth Circuit that a highway construction project running through an old-growth grove of magnificent redwood trees would not harm the forest, and more.

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National

1.) The U.S. Supreme Court granted the Trump administration’s request to halt the 2020 census count on Tuesday evening while litigation unfolds in the Ninth Circuit.

A briefcase of a census taker is seen as she knocks on the door of a residence Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020, in Winter Park, Fla. A half-million census takers head out en mass this week to knock on the doors of households that haven't yet responded to the 2020 census. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

2.) White Christians, a backbone of President Donald Trump’s support in the electorate, still back the Republican incumbent in large numbers but that support has slipped in recent weeks, the Pew Research Center reported Tuesday.

President Donald Trump holds a Bible as he visits outside St. John's Church across Lafayette Park from the White House on June 1, 2020, in Washington. Part of the church was set on fire during protests the night prior. (Patrick Semansky/AP)

3.) In a case that plunged more than a hundred U.S. Patent Trial and Appeal Board cases into uncertainty, the Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to decide how that body’s judges can be appointed.

The empty courtroom is seen at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington as the justices prepare final decisions of the high court's term, Monday, June 24, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

4.) Justice Clarence Thomas on Tuesday urged his colleagues to soon tackle the issue of immunity for internet platforms after the Supreme Court decided not to hear a dispute over a cybersecurity software company blocking its rival.

The U.S. Supreme Court. (Jack Rodgers/Courthouse News)

5.) The partisan divide over climate change is closing as more people say global warming is an issue they are seeing play out in their lifetimes.

Protesters gather outside the White House in Washington on June 1, 2017, opposing President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the Unites States from the Paris climate change accord. (SUSAN WALSH/AP)

6.) Democrats drilling Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett buckled down Tuesday on their warnings that Republicans are commandeering the high court to overturn the landmark health care legislation that protects those with preexisting conditions, among the 7 million Americans who contracted Covid-19 this year.  

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett speaks during a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

Regional

7.) For decades, battles over voting rights have essentially been part of the curriculum for students at Prairie View A&M University, a historically Black college in Texas. They are receiving another lesson now in a trial fighting for early voting to be made a fixture on campus.

Panther Stadium at Prairie View A&M University. (Photo by Maureen Allen via Wikimedia Commons)

8.) California officials appeared in front of a three-judge panel at the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday to argue a highway construction project running through an old-growth grove of magnificent redwood trees would not harm the forest. 

Highway 101 winds through groves of majestic redwood trees in Northern California. (William Dotinga/Courthouse News)
Categories / Uncategorized

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