Top Eight

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top eight CNS stories for today including the 54th consecutive night of protests against racism and police brutality in Portland was filled with drumming and dancing, then with tear gas and flash bangs; California secured the dubious distinction of having the most coronavirus cases in the United States; Senators debated the need for more federal dollars to help states conduct voting safely, and more.

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National

1.) With the 2020 election looming and the coronavirus pandemic continuing to rage across the country, senators and state election officials debated the need Wednesday for more federal dollars to help states conduct voting safely.

(AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

2.) As the number of confirmed U.S. cases of Covid-19 neared 4 million on Wednesday, the Trump administration announced an almost $2 billion vaccine contract with the New York-based pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and a German biotechnology company.

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

3.) Markets crept upward after a sluggish start, with few data points on Wednesday but a glut of earnings on tap. 

(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Regional

4.) The 54th consecutive night of protests against racism and police brutality was filled with drumming and dancing, then with tear gas and flash bangs.

(Courthouse News photo/Karina Brown)

5.) Thanks to a new daily high of over 12,800 new cases, California on Wednesday secured the dubious distinction of having the most coronavirus cases in the United States.

(AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

6.) The former Minneapolis police officer accused of murdering George Floyd is in more legal trouble after being charged Wednesday with felony tax fraud.

( Ramsey County Sheriff’s Office via AP)

7.) Every week, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, New York City’s public transit system loses about two-thirds as much in revenue as it costs to operate. As its chairman put it Wednesday, the very survival of the Metropolitan Transportation Agency is in peril.

(Image via Courthouse News)

8.) The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Wednesday that endangered species protections for a certain population segment of the Arctic grayling are no longer necessary, claiming the future for the long-beleaguered fish is “shining brightly.”

(Ben Pierce/The Bozeman Chronicle via AP)
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