The Vote

       On the day before an election, we have a meeting at work and all get together and discuss the ballot measures and the candidates. My main message at CNS has always been that I don’t care how you vote, as long as you vote. 
       Since politics sometimes approaches religion in the absolute beliefs it tends to generate, I was initially worried about the discussion. But after a couple election cycles, everyone here welcomes the chance to figure out the ballot measures and hear some of the arguments.
     It gets people excited and enthusiastic, as it does for me.
      So on the day before Super Tuesday, we got together to discuss the ballot. And we saved the Presidential candidates for last. The room held three people committed to Hillary, two for Obama, two undecideds and one independent.
     The FedEx guy, who is a young, Dodger fan, came in for a pick-up. And we asked him. To my surprise, he said, “Hillary.”
     The reasons for their choices reflected the bare bones of the race, with those in favor of Hillary saying it was because of her experience and those in favor of Obama saying he was a new face, and a change from the old. 
       My reason was health care, which I think is the single biggest corrosive factor in the western, relatively secure, middle class life that most Americans could once expect and that a great majority of Europeans now enjoy.
     Hillary supports universal health care, Obama simply wants to make health care cheaper, something I have been hearing about for forty years. For my money, he is Democrat Lite.
      After our meeting at work, I stepped across the street to a little Famima convenience market, and, in the processing of buying a cup of tea, asked the checkers. Both women, one young and Asian, the other older and white, said they were voting for Hillary.
     That night I stopped by the supermarket after a salsa lesson. I asked the checker, who is a young, black woman. To my surprise, she said Hillary.
     The bagger, a young Hispanic woman, said the same, both reasoning that Hillary had already made some Presidential decisions the first time through the White House.
     Another checker, who is Hispanic and a single, mother of two, also said she was voting for Clinton, because of health care and the sense that she would look out more for the average American.
     My sisters are split between the two Democrats. My mother votes by absentee ballot and she asked me to help her fill it out. When it came to the candidates, she seemed hesitant.
     I said the choice is between Obama and Hillary. Her stark answer was, “I don’t care much for Hillary.”
     So that left Obama. And she put her mark next to his name.
     Now, on the morning after the vote, it seems that my local survey was not far off for California. But my mom may well be right about who becomes the next President.

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