Agencies Rush Strategy to Delist Endangered Grizzly Bear

As grizzly bears move from the northern ranges of Montana onto the plains, wildlife agencies are scrambling to remove the population from endangered species protection. But opponents of the delisting have hinted that legal challenges and regulatory hurdles lie ahead.

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Groups Fight Uphill Battle to Protect Sea Lions’ Food in Alaska

Environmentalists took their fight against the feds’ authorization of more commercial fishing in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands to the Ninth Circuit on Thursday, reiterating their argument that more fishing means less fish for the endangered Stellar sea lion.

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Illegal Pot Grows: Dangerous for Species, Agencies and Recreationalists

If while hiking in the pristine wilderness of a northern California wildlife refuge you run into a dump site, back out quickly and quietly and return to safety, as it may be more than a toxic hazard, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service advises. You most likely stumbled onto an illegal pot grow and could be in imminent danger from armed guards posted by the criminal organizations that run these sites, the agency warns.

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Endangered Panther Making Gains in Southwest Florida

The long-endangered Florida panther is making gains in the southwest corner of the state, and the number of adults and subadults now may be as high as 230 in the species’ traditional breeding area, according to the latest audit by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

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Don’t Tell Us How to Hunt, Alaska Tells Washington

Alaska sued the United States for telling it how its subsistence hunters and trappers can hunt bears, caribou and wolves on its 100 million acres of federal land. “Alaskans depend on wildlife for food,” the state’s attorney general said, and Washington cannot “control Alaskans’ way of life and how Alaskans conduct their business.”

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Fed Rejection of Local Sage Grouse Plan Prompts Lawsuit

In March, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell traveled to the remote southeast corner of Oregon to praise locals for sticking to a collaborative process that brought ranchers, environmentalists and the government together to forge a land use plan that everyone could agree on. However, Jewell’s rejection of a related collaborative plan is now the subject of lawsuit from a local group that helped create it.

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