Media Access

The Fifth Circuit dismissed a magazine’s challenge to a legislator’s refusal to issue its reporters media pass cards for the 2019 legislative session. The magazine regularly gave the legislator, who heads the office that issues press passes, an “F” rating and endorsed his challengers. However, the legislative session has already ended and it is not clear that the magazine will be denied again in 2020.

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ACLU Wants Feds Sanctioned for Violence Against Press in Oregon

Federal agents in Portland resumed their assaults on journalists and legal observers just hours after a federal judge ordered them not to do so, the American Civil Liberties Union argued Tuesday in a motion calling for federal agents and their supervisors to be held in contempt.

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Tennessee Supreme Court Sets Limit on Fair-Report Privilege

What began with a youth football league’s fundraiser gone bad led to the Tennessee Supreme Court deciding on Thursday the fair report privilege – the privilege protecting journalists reporting on what is said during official government proceedings from defamation claims – doesn’t extend to journalists reporting on what officials tell them in one-on-one interviews.

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Trump Campaign Pulls Press Credentials for Bloomberg News Reporters

The Trump campaign Monday revoked press credentials for Bloomberg News reporters after the news organization stood by its decision not to investigate its namesake founder, Mike Bloomberg, or other Democratic candidates running against the incumbent Republican president in 2020.

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Robert Durst Loses a Round as Murder Trial Approaches

A Los Angeles judge on Tuesday rejected an attempt by defense attorneys for accused murderer Robert Durst to strip the producers of an Emmy-winning documentary series about Durst’s alleged crimes of protection under California’s journalist shield law by having them declared “government agents.”

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Irreverent Student Newspaper Wins Ninth Circuit Ruling Over ‘Safe Spaces’ Satire

Securing a win for collegiate free press, a Ninth Circuit panel ruled Wednesday that a case involving the University of California, San Diego’s satirical student newspaper The Koala, free speech and student organization funding should not have been dismissed.

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