Science!

A noted public figure recently suggested that massively destructive hurricanes can be aborted by attacking them with nuclear weapons. This, of course, is ridiculous — we can’t afford to repeatedly create new bombs and, even if we could, there’s a limit on the world’s supply of radioactive material. What happens when we run out?

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A Reason to Leave Twitter

Finally! There’s a reason — and, hopefully, a motivation — for politicians not to appear on Twitter: You don’t have to listen to anyone disagreeing with you. Some of you out there may think that free and open discussions are good for democracy and persuasion, but be honest, do you really enjoy listening to all those dumb people who don’t think like you do?

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Pioneering Florida

I already knew Florida got a bad rap and there was proof of that fact last week. In case you don’t know, we all get to make fun of weird people in Florida because the state makes police reports public and easily accessible to nosy newsers. So we get the funny stories.

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Real Voter Fraud

Massive voter fraud in the U.S. may or may not exist. It probably doesn’t, but if it does, it’s a pretty successful hidden operation. What indubitably does exist, however, is petition fraud. And why not? It’s a lot easier to fake random signatures than it is to sabotage official polling places.

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Politics in Court

I know that courts are political these days, but does it really matter in a misdemeanor, small claims or traffic court? And how exactly do you define improper political statements in court? Shouldn’t the entire U.S. Supreme Court be disqualified from hearing anything controversial because all the justices seem pretty political?

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Uncharted Waters

Typos or omissions can be so entertaining — especially if it takes a while to realize they’re mistakes. Consider this from an article last week on the Oxford Political Review website: “Invented by Professor Christopher Columbus at Harvard Law School, the case method is based on the idea that law can be understood by reading cases.”

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