High Court Backs Tribal Designation for Wide Swath of Oklahoma Land

In a decision that reclassifies a large swath of eastern Oklahoma as land belonging to Native Americans driven from their ancestral home during the Trail of Tears, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Tuesday that a Seminole man sentenced to 500 years in prison for rape and sodomy should have been tried in federal court.

Read more

Landowners Lose Again in Fight to Strip Protections for Rare Spider

A rare species of blind, cave-dwelling spider in the Central Texas hill country will remain federally protected under the Endangered Species Act for now, despite a legal fight brought by landowners and private property advocates who claim the spider’s protection has threatened development projects and led to tens of millions of dollars in permitting costs.

Read more

Emergency Restrictions

A federal court in Texas ruled the City of San Antonio improperly removed a vape shop’s complaint from state court, finding the shop has only asserted claims under the Texas Constitution and state law. After the shop violated the city’s Covid-19 related emergency restrictions several times, the city revoked its certificate of occupancy and threatened to turn off its utilities. 

Read more

Fight for Trump’s Tax Returns Is Held Over McGahn Subpoena

A federal judge put the House lawsuit for President Donald Trump’s tax returns on hold Friday. Unlike other cases across the country that have ground to a halt, however, this stay relates not to the coronavirus pandemic but to another subpoena facing appellate scrutiny.

Read more

Sailors Ask Ninth Circuit to Revive Fukushima Class Action

A three-judge panel in the Ninth Circuit Tuesday considered whether a U.S. federal court has jurisdiction over negligence and wrongful death claims brought by hundreds of U.S. sailors exposed to radiation while rendering humanitarian aid in Fukushima, Japan, following a 2011 tsunami and nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Read more