Police Beating

Two Gretna, Louisiana, police officers who beat and tased an unarmed man with paranoid schizophrenia — who became unresponsive and died two days later — are not entitled to qualified immunity on excessive force claims, the Fifth Circuit ruled. The man, who was not suspected of any crime, was curled in a fetal position and did not struggle against the officers, called for his mother and pleaded for someone to “call the real police” as he sustained 26 blunt-force injuries.

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Police Shooting

The Ninth Circuit upheld a ruling in favor of a Los Angeles police officer who shot and killed a 14-year-old boy. Although a member of the jury in this excessive force case was in social media groups that closely followed law enforcement activity, and didn’t disclose that fact, such an affiliation “would not have provided a basis for a challenge for cause.”

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Gym Shooting

A federal court in California denied a Los Angeles police officer’s motion for summary judgment in a wrongful death suit alleging unreasonable use of deadly force during an altercation in a gym locker room that ended with the officer shooting a man multiple times. There’s a genuine question as to whether the man posed a threat to justify such a response.

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Qualified Immunity

A man may pursue part of his civil rights suit accusing police officers in Waco, Texas, of beating him to the point where he was “bleeding profusely” after he refused to provide his ID when he was pulled over for changing lanes without signaling fast enough, a federal court in Texas ruled, finding a further development of the facts is required to determine whether qualified immunity is entitled.

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Excessive Force

A federal court in Texas ruled that excessive force and fabrication of evidence claims may continue against two police officers who shot, without warning, an armed juvenile who had a gun to his own head. The officers shot the boy multiple times and, as an “involuntary reflex to being shot,” the boy pulled the trigger of his own gun, shooting himself in the temple.

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Excessive Force

In a dispute arising from the arrest of a man who had threatened his girlfriend and her daughters with a chainsaw, the Ninth Circuit reversed a ruling in favor of one of the arresting officers, finding that controlling precedent at the time “put officers on notice” that kneeling on a prone and non-resisting person’s back so hard as to cause injury was excessive.

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