Credible Fear Interview

A federal court in Texas ruled that it lacks jurisdiction to hear an Angolan man’s challenges to his expedited order of removal. The asylum seeker, who was beaten by police and military in his home country because of his father’s political ties, did not understand the translator during his credible fear interview because she did not speak the dialect of Portuguese he does. 

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Gerrymandering Suit

The Fifth Circuit ruled against four white voters who sued Dallas County, claiming its 2011 redistricting plan for electing county commissioners was racially discriminatory because it provided only one “Anglo-majority district.” The court found the plaintiffs could not prove the plan amounted to “racial gerrymandering.”

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Death in Police Custody

Police officers in an excessive force case brought by the family of Terrell Day, who died from restricted breathing while in custody, are entitled to immunity, the Seventh Circuit ruled, finding that the handcuffs were used “in a manner that would not have harmed an average arrestee” and the officers did not know they were causing the man’s breathing trouble.

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Embassy Attorney Policy

The government’s policy barring attorneys from attending passport and Consular Reports of Birth Abroad interviews at the U.S. Embassy in Djibouti was a violation of due process, a federal court in New York ruled. Plaintiffs testified that embassy employees routinely confiscated their passports and other documents and would be “detained for hours without food, water, or their required medication.”

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Facebook Posts

A Texas trial court properly required certain Facebook posts at the center of a defamation case to be deleted as the litigation continues, an appeals court in the state ruled. The posts claimed that the plaintiff is a “Viet Cong spy living among the Vietnamese-American refugee population” and listed her address. The woman was threatened with violence and feared for her and her children’s safety.

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