No Changes to Dams Now for Threatened Salmon, Judge Rules

Operations of the 13 dams along the Willamette River are making it harder for threatened salmon to survive, according to federal judge who ruled Wednesday that there is no need to force the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to change operations now because the case will require any needed changes in the next year or two.

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Testimony Wraps in Trial Over Hurricane Harvey Flooding

For 13 years Eleonora Slovokhotova knew nothing of the danger lurking in her suburban Houston neighborhood, which she describes as “a wonderful area, golf courses and happy smiling faces.” The intruder stole softly into living rooms one night in August 2017 after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers closed the gates on two dams amid historic flooding.

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Oregon: Federal Plan to Save Salmon by Killing Birds Backfired

The federal government killed thousands of double-crested cormorants in Oregon between 2015 and 2017, and may have caused the collapse of the birds’ largest breeding colony in a bungled effort to help young salmon make it to the ocean alive. Meanwhile, state biologists say the birds just moved upriver – and eat three times more salmon.

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Wisconsin Tribe Sues Over Proposed Mine in Upper Peninsula

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin claims in a federal lawsuit that the Environmental Protection Agency must take control of the permitting process for a proposed sulfide mine along a river on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula because the river and its wetlands are protected interstate waters.

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Giant Traffic Jam for Two Judges in Houston Flood Litigation

Around 50 attorneys representing people whose homes or businesses were damaged by flooding from two Houston dams in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey crowded into a federal courtroom Wednesday to recommend how to organize the litigants into subgroups, while some asked to be named lead counsel for the sprawling litigation.

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