Nightly Brief

     

     Top CNS stories for today including Bridgegate cover-up had N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s backing, star federal witness says; the federal government bans elephant trophy imports; a double-jeopardy case is the first case of the Supreme Court’s fall term, and more.
     
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     1.) Bridgegate Cover-Up Had Cuomo’s Backing, Star Federal Witness Says
     New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office had a hand in the cover-up story for New Jersey’s 2013 politically engineered traffic jam, a convicted Republican operative testified Tuesday.
     
     2.) Feds’ Ban on Elephant Trophy Imports OK’d
     Rejecting the notion that killing elephants will save them, a federal judge has ruled against the National Rifle Association in its challenge to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s ban on importing elephant trophies.
     
     3.) Gripe About Juror Diversity Kicks Off Derrick Rose Trial
     As jury selection began Tuesday for the civil trial of a woman accusing NBA star Derrick Rose of sexually assaulting her, Rose’s attorney complained of a lack of diversity in the prospective panel of jurors after it was revealed that the plaintiff is Mexican-American.
     
     4.) Double-Jeopardy Case 1st of High Court’s Fall Term
     The Justice Department faced an uphill Supreme Court battle Tuesday in fighting to retry a Puerto Rican lawmaker who successfully appealed a mixed bribery verdict.
     
     5.) Zika Infection Now Linked to Host of Birth Defects
     Infants risk developing birth defects other than microcephaly when their mothers have a Zika infection, adding more evidence that the virus poses a bigger threat than previously thought following the initial outbreak in Brazil in 2015.
     
     6.) Met Museum Sued for $100 Million Picasso
     After a five-year standoff, the survivor of a German Jewish World War II refugee sued the Metropolitan Museum of Art for $100 million, in a fight over a 1905 Picasso painting
     
     7.) Chicago Cops Have Case Against Sun-Times
     The Chicago Sun-Times did not violate privacy when it obtained personal information on five police officers, but it did when it published it in a story accusing the Chicago police department of manipulating a homicide investigation involving the nephew of former Mayor Richie Daley, a federal judge ruled.
     
     8.) Fight for Seabird Includes Old-Growth Forests
     The Audubon Society of Portland, which led the fight to protect the marbled murrelet, says the Oregon Board of Forestry is not doing enough to protect the old-growth forest the seabird needs to survive.
     

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